Tag: Visual SenseMaking

09
Aug

Virtual Visual SenseMaking

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In the Recording Studio

Humantific’s E. Pastor and GK. VanPatter having a few laughs working in the studio recording the new Visual SenseMaking virtual course as part of the new Future Work Skills Academy in collaboration with our friends at 4th Industrial Revolution.

Big thanks to Donna Eiby for all her amazing guidance and support in this new adventure. Designing and delivering virtual learning programs is hard work!

Virtual Visual SenseMaking Coming Soon!

Send us an email if you would like to be advised when this program launches. kickitup (at) humantific (dot) com

 

16
Oct

Humantific leading BRAINBOOM at IED

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Humantific CoFounder Elizabeth Pastor will be back at Institute for European Design [IED] next week leading BRAINBOOM a customized innovation skill-building experience created for incoming graduate students by Humantific in collaboration with IED leaders.

Building on the theme of New Visions, New Leaders, we have redesigned orientation in the form of a cross-department skill-building experience. At IED incoming graduate students from multiple departments now experience orientation together as a foundational skill-building workshop!

Continue Reading..

27
May

Miosuro Visual SenseMaking at CPSI

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Humantific’s Valentina Miosuro will be teaching a Visual SenseMaking workshop at the upcoming CPSI 2014 (Creative Problem Solving Institute) conference June 18 to 22 in Buffalo, NY.

For those not familiar with the applied creativity community of practice also called the CPS (Creative Problem Solving) community, this is its long running annual conference and the most important event of the year. This year CPSI is celebrating its 60th anniversary!

“About CPSI:  CPSI is an annual international conference hosted by the Creative Education Foundation focused on three main areas – creativity, innovation and leading change.”

What is Visual SenseMaking?

It’s not graphic facilitation! Visual SenseMaking is the activity of making sense of ambiguous complex situations, through visual methods and tools including word, images, drawings, diagrams, charts, graphs. The power of Humantific’s Visual SenseMaking is that we integrate it with advanced Strategic Cocreation skills. While the skill of Visual SenseMaking can be broadly applied to many life situations, we focus on Visual SenseMaking in the context of organizational change making.

At Humantific Visual SenseMaking is part of a broader skill-building program that we offer our organizational leader clients. Humantific’s Complexity Navigation Program combines basic and advanced skill-building in Strategic Cocreation, Design Research and Visual SenseMaking. Combined these are change oriented 21st century leadership skills.

Related: See what we do with Visual SenseMaking!

Visual SenseMaking

SenseMaking for ChangeMaking

The OTHER Design Thinking

 

15
Apr

Visual SenseMaking in Madrid

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Upcoming at Matadero Madrid, Humantific is holding an open public Visual SenseMaking workshop on April 29.

Humantific CoFounder Elizabeth Pastor will be teaching a one hour introduction to Visual SenseMaking in Spanish. All are welcome.

For those who might not know: Visual SenseMaking is not graphic facilitation! Come and learn more about how Humantific does what it does to help organizational leaders make sense of complex situations and convert complexity to innovation fuel.

Registration is now open!

Elizabeth will also be doing BRAINBOOM 2 with graduate students at the European Institute of Design next week in Madrid…See here!

Questions? Email us: engage (at) humantific (dot) com

 

 

26
Jun

SenseMaking at IDEAS to ACTION!

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Last week Elizabeth Pastor taught Humantific’s Glimpse into Visual SenseMaking Workshop at the IDEAS to ACTION International Conference on Creativity & Innovation in Atlanta hosted by the Creative Education Foundation. The CPSI Conference is an important event in the Applied Creatvity community that has been around for many years. It was launched in 1954 by Alex Osborn and is still rockin.

Feedback from the Humantific workshop has been extremely positive. One participant said that Elizabeth’s workshop was among the most valuable and successful at the event. We are pleased to hear that participants will be taking their new Visual SenseMaking skills into practice in their everyday lives.

Visual SenseMaking is one component in the Humantific Complexity Navigation Program that combines Strategic CoCreation, Design Research and Visual SenseMaking. These are 21st century leadership skills applicable to leaders in all industries.

See more on Complexity Navigation here:

Humantific at the BBC in London
Humantific at Instituto Europeo di Design in Madrid
Complexity Navigation Program

For information of how to get Humantific at your innovation event write to programs (@) humantific (dot) com

 

 

24
May

Humantific Returns to BBC London

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The Humantific Academy team returns to London this week to do back-to-back skill building workshops for the BBC Customer Experience Group.

Many Humantific clients are interested in how we do what we do and seek knowledge transfer. Inside Humantific’s Complexity Navigation Program we teach advanced skill-building in Strategic CoCreation, Design Research and Visual SenseMaking. Combined these are next generation innovation leadership skills.

Last summer we introduced the program to the BBC and they asked us to come back to London to do another round of skill-building in a series of back-to-back Strategic CoCreation workshops throughout this week.

Many experience design groups are seeking to add additional upstream value in their organizations by upskilling in the direction of Strategic CoCreation. They want to be able to go out into their organization to help other groups with all kinds of innovation and change related challenges not just experience design related challenges.

Related:

Humantific Teaching MBA Students at ICADE Business School

13
Feb

Humantific Inspires SenseMaking MBA Thesis

It’s always great to see graduate students inspired by Humantific. Attending the Executive MBA program at University of Reading Business School in Denmark, our new best friend, Sandra Greve, recently completed her thesis entitled, Towards an Understanding of How to Enhance SenseMaking in Organizational Strategic Change.

A big Wooooooo Hoooooooo for Sandra!

As the rise of SenseMaking appears on more and more radar screens, what we are seeing is that seasoned professionals from many backgrounds are becoming interested.

Humantific is delighted to be part of an ever-expanding community, engaged from many different angles, in the re-examination and reinvention of SenseMaking. We started presenting on the subject in 1998 at a Cooper-Hewitt Conference, here in NYC. Not everyone understood what we were talking about then, but, since that time, we have seen steady growing interest in the value of continous SenseMaking in the context of a continously changing world.

If you have an interest in this subject, and would like to attend a future SenseMaker Dialogs event in Copenhagen, Madrid, Barcelona, New York, San Francisco, or Sao Paulo, feel free to subscribe to Humantific Quarterly or send us an email: programs (at) humantific (dot) com

To view and or download a full copy of Sandra Greve’s MBA thesis (Courtesy of Sandra), Click Here

Related:

NextD Geographies / SenseMaking is Rising

Understanding Social SenseMaking

SenseMaker Dialogs on Facebook

Social SenseMaking on Facebook

03
Feb

Lecture at IESE Sold Out!

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Humantific CoFounder, Elizabeth Pastor presented SenseMaking for ChangeMaking at IESE’s Graduate Business School in New York City last night.

Elizabeth explained how Humantific has, for more than ten years, been working closely with business leaders in many industries who are engaged in driving change in their organizations. Elizabeth talked about the rising interest in the subjects of SenseMaking and ChangeMaking and how Humantific started connecting them together years ago, developing new knowledge, tools and an interconnected training program.

Connecting SenseMaking and ChangeMaking Humantific helps organizational leaders tackle complex fuzzy challenges and embed the capability to do so into their organizations.

Today we recognize that SenseMaking has already become the 21st century FUEL for ChangeMaking.

Elizabeth will be speaking at IESE in Madrid soon, so our Spanish friends stayed tuned!

See related from IESE:
http://www.iese.edu/Aplicaciones/News/view.asp?id=3319&k=sensemaking_fuels_changemaking

See more of Humantific’s work:
Liquidnet Markets for Good: Strategic Planning
BBC Workshop ONE, TWO & THREE
Sermo: Making a Company Understandable

30
Jan

Lost Stories Information Design History

In a competitive business marketplace, not everyone wants to acknowledge that each generation tends to learn from, build on, or divert from the previous generation’s ideas and output. We see this phenomenon clearly evident in the various streams of Visual SenseMaking history.

Predating the important work of Isotype Institute are numerous landmarks in the history of Statistical Graphics, which later evolved into Information Design—some aspects of which evolved into “Information Architecture” and then in a different direction “Visual SenseMaking” today, a subsubsetset of which has evolved into Data Visualization (long story for another day). Some historical landmarks are well known to many, while others remain off most radar screens, especially to new generations. Particularly online, we notice a general lack of historical awareness and crediting in many current data visualization, design and innovation-related discussions.

At Humantific, we have significant interest in the forgotten stories, lost stories, and off-the-beaten-path landmarks of sensemaking and changemaking history, as they have the potential to inform present day understanding significantly. We try to gather such stories and make them part of the collection that we share here publicly. One such landmark publication is Willard Cope Brinton’s 1917 book, Graphic Methods for Presenting Facts.

Willard C. Brinton (1880-1957) remains a relative unknown, one of several largely unsung, historical visual thinking pioneers. No entry for Brinton appears on Wikipedia, for example. Who he was, what he did, and why it was important is one of many stories buried in the history of Information Design.

Published in black and white when Brinton was thirty-four years old, the 371 page Graphic Methods for Presenting Facts is an impressive, early survey of what would today be considered to be bare-bones statistical diagrams and graphic techniques that existed at that moment. Now scarce in original form, this early volume is recognized as the first American book focused on graphic techniques geared for a general audience.

What a rockin’ idea it must have been in 1917 to do a “visual thinking techniques” book! From the book’s introduction: “As far as the author is aware, there is no book published in any language covering the field which it has been attempted to cover here.”

In the book, Brinton refers to himself as a “Consulting Engineer,” and member of the Society of Mechanical Engineers. He had an office here in New York City! He was Chairman of a committee on standards for graphic presentation formed in 1914, as well as a fellow of the American Statistical Association.  An engineering approach is clearly evident, as is the focus on building diagrams based on data, statistics, and facts. Notably, Brinton’s orientation in the book is one of advisor and commentator on the assembled work of others—an orientation that can also be seen, much later, in the work of Edward Tufte.

Graphic Methods for Presenting Facts contains numerous gems, including one particularly significant page in 20th century information design history. On page 39 (shown middle above), one can see an important design idea that Isotype is often given credit for originating. The evolutionary notion of repeating figure icons, rather than increasing their size, to depict size of a group became part of Isotype’s now well-known visual language style. Rumor has it, that Brinton’s book was in Otto Neurath’s 1920’s library. Ninety+ years after it appeared in Brinton’s book, this design idea, in refined form, is still very much in use today.

The truth is, much of the early writing on the subject of Statistical Graphics tends to be tactical; Brinton writes, in his comments, on a particular diagram by others: “This is an admirable piece of presentation even though the lettering and drafting are not quite as good as they might have been if more care had been used…” This kind of tactical commentary on now-out-of-date techniques makes up a large part of the book. Even today, many techniques in any technology get dated very quickly. It is often hard to know what has legs, and what will be gone tomorrow.

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At Humantific, we are generally less interested in rapidly dated tactics, and more interested in broader considerations. What we do is look at historical Information Design materials through a time-oriented viewing frame, a simple 3-part lens that we call SenseWHEN. Apart from technique considerations, we want to know: WHEN was the focus of the picture being viewed? Was the goal to create a sensemaking picture of  Yesterday, Today or Tomorrow? We also want to know, at what scale were the views taken? Is this a picture of a person, a product, an organization, or a society?

Utilizing these simple viewing lenses, we notice that much of Information Design history, including that appearing in this early book, has been focused on creating sensemaking pictures of Yesterday and Today. Most often, these are pictures that can be constructed from data sets and facts. Much less frequently in that history, do you see pictures of Tomorrow. This is an entire subject unto itself that we will be writing more about, as it connects directly to what we do at Humantific: How can pictures of Tomorrow be cocreated in real time, by humans from multiple disciplines? It remains a subject that is near and dear to us. It certainly does connect to the history of Information Design seen here, but is rather different in orientation.

If Brinton preceded Neurath’s Isotype, you might be wondering: Who preceded Brinton? In his later, much more graphic, 1939 self-published book entitled Graphic Presentation, Brinton acknowledged that he did not know of the earlier groundbreaking work of William Playfair (1759-1823) when he was working, in 1912, on Graphic Methods for Presenting Facts. Brinton dedicated his 1939 book to Playfair, who is credited with creating some of the earliest examples of diagrams in his 1786, 1801, 1805, and 1822 books. William Playfair was also an Engineer, making pictures of Yesterday and Today.

For those who might not know—yes, before Playfair, there was Joseph Priestly (not an Engineer) who made timelines of Yesterday and Today. On and on it goes…:-)

Images Source: Brinton, Willard Cope. Graphic Methods for Presenting Facts. 1917. Diagrams by Willard Cope Brinton & Others. Humantific Collection, New York.

Related:

Data Visualization Meets CoCreation

Humantific: SenseMaking for ChangeMaking

Humantific: The OTHER Design Thinking

Making Sense of Early SenseMakers

 

19
Jan

VisBit 10: Democracy – Who is #1?

As the 2012 election season comes into full swing, it’s a good time to reflect on the state of democracy in America. How well do you think this country scored on the Democracy Index?
Answer: Not great.

The Democracy Index is an index compiled by the Economist Intelligence Unit that measures democracy in 167 countries around the world. It is based on indicators in the categories of electoral process and pluralism, civil liberties, functioning of government, political participation and political culture.

The highest score, 9.80 out of 10, went to Norway. Next was Iceland with 9.65, then Denmark with 9.52, Sweden with 9.50, and New Zealand was 5th on the list with a score of 9.26.

The United States was 17th on the list, with a score of 8.16.
We also checked out some other countries represented by the Humantific team:
Canada was 8th (score: 9.08), Spain was 25th (score: 8.02), and Italy was 31st (score: 7.74).

Who scored the worst? You guessed it: North Korea, with a score of 1.08.

See other VisBits Here:

VisBit 9: Mobile Phones per Capita
VisBit 8: Life Expectancy
VisBit 7: Education and Earnings

Source: Democracy Index 2011 Rankings