Tag: Systemic Design

11
Nov

The OTHER Design Thinking

Call For Participants:

Humantific CoFounder Elizabeth Pastor presented The OTHER Design Thinking for the first time last week at the Design Thinkers 2013 conference in Toronto.

In the presentation Humantific points out what realms of knowledge are now being blended in practice today as well as 10 differences between Mainstream Design Thinking and The OTHER Design Thinking.

It is becoming clear to many that the era of assuming that all wicked social problems can be solved by creating more products and services is over.

Part of the presentation is an invitational call for submissions in reference to inclusion in our next virtual book entitled The OTHER Design Thinking now in progress. We are looking for 3-4 other leading innovation practices already engaged in The OTHER Design Thinking and interested in appearing in this book along with Humantific.

If you are operating a practice where you begin all projects with the built-in assumption that products, services and or experiences will be outcomes [Design 1 & Design 2] so sorry but this is not a project for you. That circle of mainstream practices has already been widely covered, over and over again in the mainstream business media, in mainstream design media, mainstream design thinking movies, in mainstream books, etc.

This project seeks to give voice to a different circle of other emerging practices that make no such up-front assumptions. [See “10 Ways its Different” on pages 77 to 99].

If you are engaged in design thinking oriented innovation practice and have already been operating beyond the “Crossover Era” for at least 5 years feel free to contact us if you would like to be considered.

Email expressions of interest to: kickitup (at) humantific (dot) com

This project builds on previous work.

Related:

Innovation Methods Mapping / Preview

NextDesign Geographies
Making Sense of Design 1,2,3,4
Understanding The Future That Has Already Arrived

NextD Reality Check

When [Old Design Thinking] LOVE is Not Enough

28
Oct

BRAINBOOM! in Madrid: It’s a WRAP!

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BRAINBOOM! wrapped up on Friday in Madrid. Thanks to all who participated.

Our congratulations and best wishes go out to all of the masters students at the Istituto Europeo di Design (IED) Madrid who kicked off their year with the 4-day BRAINBOOM! event, designed and delivered by Humantific. Nearly 200 participants from around the globe came together for 4 days of intensive cocreation, visual sensemaking, and envisioning skill-building. It was an incredible few days for all involved.

Our special thanks goes to the IED faculty and staff for a great collaboration! Thanks for having the courage to undertake such an adventuresome rethinking of graduate student orientation with us.

Interested in Future Workshops?

Skill-building workshops is only one of many work streams at Humantific. We are doing workshop based cross-disciplinary innovation skill-building on an ongoing basis with organizations in numerous countries. If you would like to consider bringing Humantific in to your organization to help with your innovation skill-building, innovation strategy creation, strategic thinking for leaders, feel free to let us know. Send email to: engage (at) humantific (dot) com

18
Oct

BRAINBOOM! IED Madrid

BRAINBOOM!

 

This week Humantific is in Madrid to help kick off the European Institute of Design’s Masters students’ 2013-2014 year! BRAINBOOM is a four night back-to-back innovation skill-building event October 22-25.

Rethinking graduate design student orientation!…Lets get to it!

Lead by Humantific’s Elizabeth Pastor and Valentina Miosuro BRAINBOOM! | innova, visualiza, colabora is a program designed for 180+ students to rapidly become familiar with their new colleagues, new environment and learn new innovation skills that will help them succeed in their programs. Designed and delivered by Humantific in collaboration with IED the BRAINBOOM skill-building experience also helps the graduate students to begin thinking about how to act on their future aspirations and goals.

Check it out at IED here.

Follow the BRAINBOOM event on Twitter at #BrainBoomIED

 

20
May

CoCreation’s Tipping Point

Every quarter we see more experts from various communities of practice discovering the power and timely relevance of cross-disciplinary cocreation. The Rise of CoCreation continues!

Each new arrival seems to offer up a different perspective on the rational, origins, structure, need and various purposes of CoCreation. Some are focused at the scale of product or service CoCreation, others on organizational change and others on societal transformation. Long a stable in leading innovation practices CoCreation is reaching its tipping point in public awareness.

Last week we were delighted to see “Social Architect”, Jon Husband join the wave, offering his view of CoCreation in his blog post:

“Co-Creating as Disruption to the Dominant Cultural Framework”

Of course, CoCreation process design, application and leadership have a long history in Applied Creativity circles. More recently in Design Thinking history CoCreation is often referred to as Participatory Design. Unlike tradional Design Thinking we consider CoCreation to be a different innovation language. We see CoCreation rising in tandem with the Rise of SenseMaking.

It seems inevitable that many new streams are emerging, some aware of CoCreation’s past and some not. Some aware of present practices and some not. As in the Design Thinking wave, Integrative Thinking wave, Big Data wave and Innovation Acceleration wave, there are always going to be repeating starting points as various disciplines arrive and chime in with their “future” depictions. The truth is CoCreation has been around a long time and continues to evolve.

Right now the Big Data wave seems to be merging with the SenseMaking wave, the CoCreation wave and the NextDesign Thinking wave which certainly makes sense to us…:-)

Some firms are not only already practicing in this direction but have codified experiential learning programs up and running. Humantific has been teaching team-based cross-disciplinary cocreation since we founded the company. We have added a lot to the original innovation program. For some time we have believed that CoCreation is just part of a new hybrid skill-set for changemaking leaders. See Teaching Complexity Navigation.

Related

Humantific Teaches CoCreation to MBA students in Madrid

Teaching CoCreation Now!

When (Old Design Thinking) Love is Not Enough

18
Apr

Innovation Methods Mapping Preview

Two + years in the making, Humantific, in concert with OPEN Innovation Consortium is sharing the preview version of the new book:

Innovation Methods Mapping / DeMystifying 80 Years of Innovation Process Design.

If you would like to send us a comment, or be placed on the pre-order list for the print version of the book please feel free to leave a comment below and or email: methodsmapping (at) openinnovationconsortium (dot) org

OVERVIEW
This workbook presents a new kind of methods analysis framework applied to 50 innovation process models spanning a period of 80+ years. Embedded in the framework is a new form of innovation process literacy, designed to enhance understanding of historical and current process models, as well as inform future process design.

PROJECT PURPOSE
This study has been created and shared for educational purposes.

This book is designed to fill what the consortium perceives to be a void in the field of innovation process knowledge.

As an OPEN Innovation Consortium initiative, the goal of this book project is to help move the art, science and design of innovation process modeling forward into the 21st century.

ABOUT OPEN INNOVATION CONSORTIUM
See Open Innovation Consortium in the Initiatives section of this Humantific website.

To receive information on other Humantific projects, events and initiatives feel free to subscribe to Humantific Quarterly.

20
Sep

Origins of How Might We?

Since the term “How Might We?” has been in the news so much recently we thought this might be a good moment to repost a small portion of an earlier article from our Lost Innovation Stories series that was published here on February 21, 2012.

In that tribute to the early work of Sidney J. Parnes Ph.D. we made reference to and gave due credit to the appearance of the term “How Might We” in Parnes’s 1967 book entitled Creative Behavior Guidebook. We consider that book to be among the top ten most important early books on the subject of Applied Creativity. Lets give credit where credit is due.

Many have since built on Sidney’s work. The good news is that much of what Parnes created and shared early on has long since passed into the public domain.

We consider Sidney Parnes to be one of several unsung pioneers in the still evolving OPEN Innovation movement. The truth is, that movement has its roots in the 1940s, 50s, 60s, rather than in 2003.

“Invitation Stems (“How Mights”)

The introduction of what are known as invitation stems, sometimes referred to as “How Mights,” are among the important tactical instruments included by Parnes in his Creative Behavior Guidebook published in 1967. Invitation stems became important, fundamental building blocks in the still-evolving logic of what is known today as “challenge framing” or “challenge mapping.” In Guidebook, Parnes introduces numerous key invitation stems that have sometimes been creatively attributed to later arriving others; included are: “How Might I?” (page131), “How Might We?” (page 125), “How Might You?” (page 161), and “In What Ways Might We?” (page 127). Since that 1967 publication, many additional invitation stems have been added by others, including “How Might They?”, “How Might Our Team?”, “How Might Our Organization?”, etc. Thanks to Sidney’s early work, “How Mights” have been in the public domain for decades, and have become integral to numerous creative thinking systems. Framed as questions in search of answers, “How Mights” can be seen in practical, everyday use within many innovation consultancies today, including Humantific, IDEO and many others. What’s different now is what we do with them.”

UPDATE: See Part 2 and Part 3 of Origins of How Might We? below in additional comments by GK VanPatter.

Note: Applied Creativity pioneer Sid Parnes authored 17 books from 1960 to 1997, including: Toward Supersanity: Channeled Freedom (1972), The Magic of Your Mind (1981), A Facilitating Style of Leadership (1985) and Source Book for Creative Problem Solving: A Fifty Year Digest of Proven Innovation Processes (1992). That list can be found on Wikipedia.

See the entire post here: Lost Stories Applied Creativity History.

Image Source: Parnes, Sidney J. Creative Behavior Guidebook. 1967. Page 125. Humantific Innovation Archives, New York.

Related:

Coming Soon:

Innovation Methods Mapping: De-Mystifying 80+ Years of Innovation Process Design.

Feel free to subscribe to Humantific Quarterly.

26
Jun

Humantific teaches at MBA Program

Humantific CoFounder, Elizabeth Pastor has been teaching cross-disciplinary strategic cocreation skills in one of Spain’s leading Business and Economics Universities, ICADE in Madrid. Elizabeth is teaching in the Executive MBA Program. Students are organizational leaders from diverse backgrounds and industries.

To learn more about how to tap into the teaching power of Humatific send an email to programs (@) humantific (dot) com

05
Jun

Humantific & FutureBankingLab

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All organizational leaders, perhaps especially those in the financial services industry, are facing enormous continous change today. For more than a year, Humantific has been working with the The Inter-American Development Bank’s FutureBankingLab designing and delivering a traveling proactive Beyond Banking Program.

The FutureBankingLab is essentially a multi-disciplinary, global think tank formed by institutions and experts in different areas of banking. It travels around the globe involving many stakeholders in structured dialogue.

Its purpose is to explore challenges and opportunties accross the global banking system at this time of great change. One of its functions is to promote sustainable governance principles that will empower the industry to thrive in a challenging future.

Having kicked off the program last year in Cologne, Germany, Humantific was recently invited back to lead the facilitation of another round of sessions in Madrid, this time focused on developing strategies to fund “The Missing Middle” in Latin America and the Caribbean’s financial sector, in  collaboration with IDB, BBVA (Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria) and the MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund).

 

24
May

Humantific Returns to BBC London

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The Humantific Academy team returns to London this week to do back-to-back skill building workshops for the BBC Customer Experience Group.

Many Humantific clients are interested in how we do what we do and seek knowledge transfer. Inside Humantific’s Complexity Navigation Program we teach advanced skill-building in Strategic CoCreation, Design Research and Visual SenseMaking. Combined these are next generation innovation leadership skills.

Last summer we introduced the program to the BBC and they asked us to come back to London to do another round of skill-building in a series of back-to-back Strategic CoCreation workshops throughout this week.

Many experience design groups are seeking to add additional upstream value in their organizations by upskilling in the direction of Strategic CoCreation. They want to be able to go out into their organization to help other groups with all kinds of innovation and change related challenges not just experience design related challenges.

Related:

Humantific Teaching MBA Students at ICADE Business School

14
Mar

Inspired by NextD Geographies

We are delighted to see many graduate and post-graduate students referencing and making use of NextD Geographies, a framework created in 2005 by Elizabeth Pastor and GK VanPatter to make sense of the design thinking community from a complexity scale perspective.  For many, that sensemaking framework has become a useful tool in their efforts to better understand the present and future states of strategic design thinking.

Perhaps a little like song writers seeing their creations adapted and interpreted by others, we might not always agree with every rendition of NextD Geographies, but it is interesting to see the various interpretations and applications across disciplines, geographies, and generations..:-)

Among the currently adapting post-graduate students is Jordan J. Lloyd, working on his PhD at the University of Sheffield School of Architecture, and is focused on “design-led approaches to managing large scale transitions in complex adaptive systems.” Jordan seems to be “interested in ‘developing a design methodology that utilises common threads between complex adaptive systems, then applying them to complex entities such as cities.'”

Of course, for us, Adaptability, Resilience and Adaptive Capacity building are not new ideas, but rather long-standing themes found in Applied Creativity history as early as 1950. What is most interesting to us is to see these themes being adapted to and imported into the rethinking of design thinking, as it continues to scale. The challenges of Adaptability have stood the test of time and remain at the center of many team, organizational, and societal challenges still today. Adaptability continues to be adapted! Friends of Humantific will know that it is the next-generation mechanics of Adaptive Capacity that we teach in Humantific and NextD workshops.

Go here to view the original NextD Geographies models.

Background Note:

Humantific launched the NextDesign Leadership initiative in 2002 as a community sensemaking and changemaking experiment outside of our practice. At that time, we viewed the traditional model of design leadership as a burning platform. Much change was needed, but existing conditions were not fully understood. Making them understood was part of the early NextD mission. Numerous frameworks, including NextD Geographies, have been published on ISSUU, and remain available for viewing for free in the NextD Archive. Some of the NextD models have been widely republished around the world, including NextD Reality Check. We continue to utilize those frameworks as NextDesign Assessment Tools when viewing design programs, faculties, leadership teams, program strategies, consultancies, innovation capacities, geographic region focuses, media focuses, design thinking skill-building programs, etc. On design thinking related questions, NextD Geographies continues to be among the most useful tools in the NextD toolbox.

To join the current conversations, go to NextDesign Leadership Network on LinkedIn. It’s an OPEN discussion group! You can follow NextD on Twitter!