Tag: Rise of SenseMaking

30
Mar

Visual SenseMaking in Context

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Elizabeth Pastor’s new LinkedIn post clarifies important differences between Visual SenseMaking and Graphic Recording.

“We have been practicing Visual SenseMaking at Humantific since our inception in 2001, and I have personally been practicing it for 20+ years. About 10 years ago, there was a boom in visual thinking. We see this interest continuing to rise in how visual thinking can contribute to complex change-making in organizations and societies. We are happy campers!

However, what has come with that rise of visual thinking is also confusion regarding the value and differences between various visualization techniques and approaches.

In this short post, I will share how we see the key differences between Visual SenseMaking and the popular activity known as Graphic Recording. Both add value but they do so in very different ways. One is not the other.”

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAvAAAAAJDQ4ZjY1MTU5LWU3NDAtNGU5OC1hYmUyLTRhMzIxNGRkODI0YgSee the entire post on LinkedIn here:

03
Aug

Making Sense of Design Thinking

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Making Sense of Design Thinking & “Agile” Method

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter just published another post in his popular ongoing “Making Sense Series.”

“Many organizational leaders have become a tad confused as various parties pitch methods in a competitive marketplace that now includes the graduate business schools and graduate design schools seeking to reposition themselves as innovation advisory consultancies..:-)”

“In this brief post, with an objective towards advocating clarity, we share how, from a practice based methods perspective, Humantific differentiates between Design Thinking methods, Product/Service/Experience Design Thinking methods and Agile methods. While they all add value, they each add different forms of value applicable to different contexts.

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Read the post on LinkedIn here:

Related:

Making Sense of “Why Design Thinking Will Fail.”

Building Strategic Innovation Lab Capabilities

Enabling Organizational Ambidexterity

28
Apr

E. Pastor Keynotes Design Intelligence

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“How Can Design Intelligence Open Our Mind & Help Us Explore What’s Next?”

Humantific CoFounder Elizabeth Pastor will be keynote speaker at Parsons Design Intelligence / Future of Work conference on Saturday April 30, 2016 in New York City.

“The Design Intelligence Conference will be held on April 30, 2016 at The New School and will feature a panel discussion, keynote, skill-based workshops, and networking opportunities for both New School students and the greater design community.

This year’s conference will be driven by questions related to The Future of Work. Through this immersive day-long experience we will explore this theme from various perspectives and sectors and through the course of the day have the opportunity to talk about design in the context of new design firms, new models and new work.”

 

11
Nov

Making Sense of Strategic Design 2015

Talking up SenseMaking

[Part 2 of 3]

Ana Barroso in Conversation with GK VanPatter

Ana Barroso: Welcome back to Part 2 of this conversation GK. Here in Latin America we are seeing rising interest in the subject of sensemaking, maybe because we have a lot of complicated things going on here!

One of the layers of findings you apply to the NextD Geographies framework has to do with the toolboxes that are increasingly more complex and cross disciplinary in Design 3 and 4. What skills does it take to conduct a visual sensemaking process? Do you believe a non-designer, without formal academic training, can make a good 3.0 or 4.0 design thinker or sensemaker? Can you describe the process of capacity building Humantific does in its innovation capacity programs?

Continue Reading..

11
Nov

Elizabeth Pastor at e-xperience 2015

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Humantific CoFounder Elizabeth Pastor will be giving a talk on SenseMaking for ChangeMaking on November 12th & 13th at e-xperience 2015 conference in Manizales, Colombia.

E-xperience 2015 is an international event held by the Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies of the Republic of Colombia (ICT Ministry), which connects and recognizes the main actors and initiatives that inspire and set trends for innovation in Digital Government.”

Continue Reading..

18
Sep

Origins of NextDesign Geographies

Talking up SenseMaking

[Part 1 of 3]

Ana Barroso in Conversation with GK VanPatter

Ana Barroso: Thanks for agreeing to do this Brazil – New York conversation. Every now and then, while reading a design or innovation related article, I find myself thinking “what would GK say about this?” Humantific has been in the sensemaking / strategic design business a long time and there are a number of questions that I want to ask you including what you think of this article by Mercin Treder entitled “Why everyone is a designer… but shouldn’t design“.
Continue Reading..

09
Jan

ISOTYPE: The Inclusion Factor

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From the Humantific Collection here are more early Isotype Institute visualizations. Today in some circles, these might be referred to as “data visualizations” or “infographics”, previously referred to as “statistical graphics”, “picture statistics”, “pictorial statistics”, “information design” and or “information visualizations”.  :-) No shortage of terms now in play. If we want to use such terms these might be thought of as societal context infographics made with a specific, very practical purpose in mind.

Close to our own Humantific work, in terms on social change-making intention, we have deep respect for the work of Isotype [International System of Typographic Picture Education] Institute. Led by Otto Neurath [1882-1945], Isotype was a pioneer in the realm of what we know today to be Social SenseMaking. In the tsunami of data visualizations being generated today it is important to note some fundamental differences.Continue Reading..

05
Jun

ReAppreciating Richard Saul Wurman

Starving for Understanding?

Required historical background reading for anyone joining Humantific is Richard Saul Wurman’s Information Anxiety, published in this first edition in 1989. Years later Richard did a refresh and republished the book as Information Anxiety 2. The later version is easier to find than the original book. Either is recommended if you want to better understand the remarkable time-warp story of how the Understanding Business, the Explaining Business, the SenseMaking Business actually preceded, by decades, the Big Data business.

Of course, all of the technology-related references inside Information Anxiety are now dated, but Richard’s central message remains even more relevant today than when it first appeared. Forget all the Big Data buzz for a moment. It was 20+ years ago that Richard began expressing concern about “the black hole between data and knowledge” and “the widening gap between what we understand and what we think we should understand”. It is rather amazing to consider Information Anxiety in the timeline of technology history. It was in 1989 that the world-wide-web began appearing in public and Apple introduced its Mac SE/30 and the Mac 11ci, running at 25 MHz with an 80 megabyte hard drive!Continue Reading..

18
Oct

McKinsey: Calling all SenseMakers!

We enjoyed reading the impressive McKinsey Global Institute Report entitled: Big Data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity.” We would highly recommend this 245 page report to anyone interested in the interconnections between so-called Big Data and Innovation.

Heavily weighted towards the technology aspects of the Big Data wave we were delighted to see growing awareness expressed regarding the human-centered aspects of the role of data and information in problem-solving and innovation.

For us these were the most important points in the 145 page document:

“Presenting information in such a way that people can consume it effectively is a key challenge that needs to be met if analyzing data is to lead to concrete action.”

“Human beings may have limits in their ability to consume and understand big data. The generation of big data may be growing exponentially and advancing technology may allow the global economy to store and process ever greater quantities of data, but there may be limits to our innate human ability—our sensory and cognitive faculties—to process this data torrent. It is said that the mind can handle about seven pieces of information in its short-term memory.”

“The topic of information overload has been widely studied by academics from neuroscientists to economists. Economist Herbert Simon once said, “A wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.”

“Despite these apparent limits, there are ways to help organizations and individuals to process, visualize, and synthesize meaning from big data. For instance, more sophisticated visualization techniques and algorithms, including automated algorithms, can enable people to see patterns in large amounts of data and help them to unearth the most pertinent insights.”

“Advancing collaboration technology also allows a large number of individuals, each of whom may possess understanding of a special area of information, to come together in order to create a whole picture to tackle interdisciplinary problems.”

“If organizations and individuals deployed such techniques more widely, end-user demand for big data could strengthen significantly.”

 “Human beings have evolved to become highly effective at perceiving certain types of patterns with their senses but continue to face significant constraints in their ability to process other types of data such as large amounts of numerical or text data. For this reason, there is a currently a tremendous amount of research and innovation in the field of visualization, i.e., techniques and technologies used for creating images, diagrams, or animations to communicate, understand, and improve the results of big data analyses. We present some examples to provide a glimpse into this burgeoning and important field that supports big data.”

“We project a need for 1.5 million additional managers and analysts in the United States who can can ask the right questions and consume the results of the analysis of big data effectively.”

The visualization examples provided in this McKinsey report are somewhat primitive and there seemed to be little awareness regarding the information design community that has been focused on shaping data and information for human digestion long before the current Big Data wave arrived.

In addition there were no examples of humans interacting with visualized information that has been integrated directly into innovation process. This report did not really talk about how leading firms are already working at this intersection combining visual sensemaking with advanced problem solving. Humantific has been working this intersection since 2001! We have already learned alot about the human to information to innovation interface! In terms of capability we call this The New Adaptability….more soon!

Overall this is an excellent report worth reading. It can be downloaded for free.

Mc Kinsey Big Data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity.

Related:

Mc Kinsey: Trust Culture = Social = Gold

The Rise of Visual SenseMaking

Go Social or Go Home

Michelle Obama talks Data Analytics!

Humantific at Data Designed for Decisions Paris

Data Visualization 1890

23
May

Future Work Skills 2020: SenseMaking

We see the rise of SenseMaking continuing with recognition now widespread as is evidenced by this Future Work Skills 2020 Report based on insights by Institute for the Future in California.

“As smart machines take over routine manufacturing and service jobs, there will be an increasing demand for the kinds of skills that remain difficult for machines to perform. We call these higher-level thinking skills that cannot yet be codified sense-making. These skills help us create unique insights that are critical to decision making.”

“….although data-mining and analytics tools can be effective at finding these kinds of connections, they cannot effectively contextualize these findings. It takes a human to assemble data and correlations and turn them into rich stories that garner attention. Humans also integrate values, morals, ethics, and other preferences in decision making.” 

One difference between this perspective by Future Institute and that of Humantific is that we utilize Visual SenseMaking not only to inform convergent “decision making” thinking but also to inform divergent idea-making thinking. We already know that both are required for effective change making in the context of organizations and societies.

See our previuosuly published SenseMaking is Rising.

For the full picture see our previously published NextDesign Geographies.

Although we have no connection to the creators of the “Future Work Skills 2020 Report” we could not help but notice that the 10 drivers highlighted in this report all connect to what Humantific is already doing in the present…:-)

1. Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines.

2. Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team.

3. SenseMaking: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed.

4. Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions.

5. Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings.

6. Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques.

7. Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based.

8. Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning.

9. New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication.

10. Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes