Tag: ReReThinking Design Education

26
Oct

Teaching Co-Creation Now

Continuing its ReReThinking Design series, NextDesign Leadership Institute has published a new virtual book: “Teaching Co-Creation Now” which makes transparent several long-brewing but seldom-talked-about graduate design education challenges. Like most NextD material, this story reflects considerable synthesis after years of listening to NextD Academy workshop participants and many visiting graduate students from around the world.

To quote the story’s author, GK VanPatter: “Not everyone is going to like the notion of defuzzing this particular subject, but when it comes to deeply understanding what the rise of cocreation really means for graduate design education, it’s getting very late. It’s possible that we have not been clear enough in some of our own earlier materials. Cross-disciplinary cocreation remains at the core of next design, whether everyone likes it or not.”

Recognizing that it’s important to walk the walk, and not just talk the talk, NextD Academy has been offering next design leadership workshops every summer since 2003. Numerous forward thinking design education leaders have attended.

Join the NextDesign Leadership Network conversations!

23
Aug

DeFuzzing Design Futures Since 2002

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NextDesign Leadership Network

Concerned about the state of design leadership skill-building in academia the NextDesign Leadership initiative was originally created by Humantific CoFounders GK VanPatter and Elizabeth Pastor in 2002. It began as a community sensemaking experiment and grew into a changemaking advocacy initiative.

Along the way we undertook and published 30 + thought leader conversations and hundreds of visual explanations regarding the current state and arriving future of design leadership.

In 2005 NextD published its legendary NextD Geographies Framework (Design at Scale 1,2,3,4) to aid in helping others better understand the various forms of design. Since then that framework has been referenced by others in hundreds of papers, books and presentations.

Since launch the NextD team has given many, many talks and held numerous public workshops around the world.

Sponsored by Humantific, the NextD Library is now located on Issuu. As a contribution to the community we happily make many documents available for free to those interested in the subject of ReRethinking Design Thinking.

We also continue to assist educational leaders interested in creating programs and cultures built around adaptable NextDesign Leadership Skills applicable in the context of Design 3 & 4 first identified as an opportunity in 2005.

As part of ongoing future work skills research NextD continues to create and share frameworks that make sense of the emerging future of design / design thinking in the 21st century.

NextDesign Leadership Principles

  1. Design thinking changes according to challenge scale.
  2. Content knowledge is not process knowledge.
  3. Facilitation is a process role not a content role.
  4. Advocating is not facilitation.
  5. Clarify/externalize/visualize process.
  6. Upstream tools are different from downstream tools.
  7. Proportion of sensemaking to strangemaking inverts as scale increases.
  8. Cocreation rises as challenge scale increases.
  9. Expand the universe, no more tribal acronyms.
  10. Think constructing challenge constellations not jumping from briefs.
  11. Sustainability is one challenge type, not meta design.
  12. Be useful in every context.

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GK VanPatter Blog Posts 2016-2017

Making Sense of “Why Design Thinking Will Fail”

Making Sense of Design Thinking & Agile Method

Making Sense of “Design Thinking is Bullshit”

Methodology Ethics: Embracing a New Era

SenseMaking is Rising: Beyond Data Visualization

Clarifying Design Thinking: Forbes Vs Humantific

Double Diamond Method: Understanding What was Missed

Origins of NextD Geographies Framework

Upstream/Downstream: Harvard Downstreams Design Thinking

NextD Early Public Workshop Examples

NextD WorkshopONE at Hyperwerk in Switerland

Hyperwerk Feedback

NextD WorkshopONE in New York

NextD WorkshopsONE, TWO, THREE in New York

In The NextD Library:

NextD Reality Check

NextD Geographies / Understanding Design 1,2,3,4

ReReThinking Design Thinking

Teaching CoCreation Now!

Understanding Design 1,2,3,4 / The Rise of Visual SenseMaking

ReThinking Wicked Problems

When [Old Design Thinking] Love is Not Enough

Design [In the Real World] is Changing / Are You?

SenseMaking is Rising

Double Consciousness / Back to the Future with Jones Chris Jones

Inspired by NextD

Design For Care

Meanings of Design Spaces

Design at Scale / DMI

New Visions, New Leaders

Humantific in Finland

CEO’s Are Designers

Aarhus School of Architecture

Design Resilience

Inspired by Skill-to-Scale

 

11
Aug

NextD Workshops: That’s a Wrap!

Our congratulations goes out to all attendees of this year’s NextD WorkshopONE, TWO & THREE. Participants from around the globe (6 countries in total) came together for 4 days of intensive facilitation training in New York City. It was an incredible few days for all involved, our special thanks to Humantific Strategylab leaders Elizabeth Pastor and Janet Getto for helping us turn our fuzzy problems into action!

Interested in Future Workshops?

Conducting NextD Workshops is only one of many work streams at Humantific. We are doing workshop based cross-disciplinary innovation skill-building on an ongoing basis with organizations in numerous countries. If you would like to consider bringing Humantific in to your organization to help with your innovation skill-building, innovation strategy creation, strategic thinking for leaders, feel free to let us know. Send email to: engage (at) humantific (dot) com

27
Jun

Thinking Made Visible Research

We are delighted to see so much interest in Humantific’s Integrative Thinking Research Initiative. Much to our surprise viewers of the Design Thinking Made Visible Project story have exceeded 15,000.

Posted for public viewing the research outcome included these findings:

Integrative Thinking Research: 10 Key Findings:

Finding 1
This research predates and debunks the widely publicized 2009 academic theory that thinking attributes (reliability & validity) can be rigidly pre-assigned to individuals or teams based on discipline labels such as design, designer or business, business manager. (This is a nice way of saying this was already known prior to 2009.)

Finding 2
Some students of design schools have the same thinking preferences as some students in business schools and vice-versa.

Finding 3
Professors and students are generally unaware of how radically different design process approaches are from one person to another.

Finding 4
Many students of design/innovation are not accustomed to externalizing their thinking process.

Finding 5
For numerous students in this study design thinking jumps off from a framed problem defined by a brief. Often there was no process activity upstream from the brief.

Finding 6
Design Thinking processes often appear very different visually while similar fundamental steps can often be found within. Some steps appear universal, other situational.

Finding 7
Most Design Thinking processes seen here have assumptions embedded that outcomes will be product or service creation.

Finding 8
Most design thinking process models seen in this study contain no reference to behaviors.

Finding 9
This research makes visible why the orchestration of design innovation work remains complex and a key challenge for teams and organizations.

Finding 10
This research suggests that real tools and visually sharable results are extremely useful in moving understanding of Integrative Thinking beyond stereotypical notions of design thinking and business thinking.

You can see these findings on pages 119-129 inside the Design Thinking Made Visible Project.

For “What is Integrative Thinking” see page 13-29
For “Humantific’s Innovation Harmonics” see page 18-29
For “Integrative Thinking in History” see page 131-135

Humantific has numerous streams of Thinking Made Visible Research in progress. Not all Humantific research is public. We often work with business leaders seeking to create private internal research projects focused on better understanding various aspects of their organizations “Innovation Brain”.

If your business organization or school would like to participate in one of our public or private streams of Thinking Made Visible Research send an email to thinkingresearch (at) humantific (dot) com.

07
Feb

Architecture / What’s Next?

We enjoyed reading the most recent issue of Architect magazine (“The Magazine of the American Institute of Architects”) entitled What’s Next?: Architecture in an age of Transformation. We recognized that many of the challenges raised in the feature article have existed in the architecture industry for many years. Since this edition of Architect magazine strives to be about organizational and industry “transformation”, we wanted to point out that there might be some process confusion embedded in “What’s Next”.

Recognizing that “What’s Next” is full of good intentions, lets not get what the magazine is successfully doing confused with the questions it raises. From a transformation methods perspective we would like to point out that the challenge of: How might a provocative magazine issue be created ? is quite different from: How might you reinvent your practice ? and How might you reinvent your industry ?. The well-meaning contributors appear to know more about the former and less about the later.

While the methodology of provocations is a useful approach to magazine article making, it is not robust enough, precise enough or scalable enough for use in addressing the latter transformation challenges. In other words, provocation is the right tool for creating entertaining magazines and the wrong method for organizational transformation. Transforming organizations and industries requires a different set of cocreation methods and skills.

Popular in academic circles, the provocations approach intermixes facts, challenges and possible solutions. In the “What’s Next” edition one can see them intertwined throughout.

While there has been no consensus (outside the magazines advisory team) on what the facts are or what the challenges are in the architecture industry, a partial picture is never-the-less created. Even with the best of intentions, the picture represented by the five central provocations in the “What’s Next” edition may or may not reflect what the key challenge areas actually are in practice and in industry.

While we were struck by the numerous insightful provocations in Bruce Mau’s “You Can Do Better” contribution to the edition it would be safe to say that the days are gone when simply complaining about complaining is enough to drive meaningful change. In the context of organizational transformation the act of “provoking” is recognized as the relatively easy lift.

Provocations tend to generate heat rather than clarity. The provocations approach typically yields more provocations, a lot of coffee chat conversations and not much forward change motion. If driving to coffee chat is your goal then provocation might be a methodology worth considering.

In the online feedback over at Architect magazines web site, one can see what happens when the wrong problems have been defined, solutions to problems that don’t exist proposed and little buy-in has occurred.

Since transformation is the subject of the edition the overall picture being created by using provocations as an approach tends to reinforce the misperception that getting to the future in organizational contexts is argument and provocation based. It seems likely that readers come away with the misperception that this is what organizational and or industry transformation looks like and feels like. In our experience transformation need not look and feel like a magazine hit-job.

The reality is organizational transformation is messy and often complex. It is quite common that the challenges present even in small organizations vastly supersede five problem areas. To undertake this kind of work one has to get ready for navigating upstream from the terrain of tidy framed briefs where many fuzzy complex challenges exist in parallel.

Perhaps ironically this is the operational terrain that Mr. Mau seemed to be referring to in his “You Can Do Better” commentary to the “What’s Next” readers: get prepared for a place where architects are willing and able to engage, not in building creation challenges alone, but rather in addressing challenges requiring no preconceived outcomes. Mr. Mau insightfully invites readers to rethink the DNA of architecture skill not the DNA of building creation. Unfortunately what is missing from “What’s Next” is the acknowledgement that getting to that terrain and operating there clearly involves more transformation skills than provocation.

While there is nothing particularly new in Mr. Mau’s message of reorientation and reskilling, the difficult and probably more meaningful truth is that much of the graduate architecture education community including high profile institutions like Harvard Graduate Design School have for more than ten years consistently missed the globalization driven message to prepare their students for working upstream from briefs. Many graduate design schools have been tone deaf to the need for this form of strategic change. In other disciplines that message was heard years ago loud and clear. As a result when it comes to leading cross-disciplinary cocreation upstream from briefs the realm of architecture is now playing catch-up. Today, much of the most current upstream cross-disciplinary cocreation knowledge exists outside of the architecture profession.

Perhaps unintentionally the “What’s Next” magazine edition brings one unasked and unanswered key question into clear view, and that is: How will the professional association of AIA provide relevant value to its members going forward in this time of great change? If we can acknowledge that the days are already gone when it is enough for a professional association to sponsor a magazine provoking “dialogue” as its contribution to industry transformation, what then is AIA’s plan for helping its membership make sense of and navigate the realities of what’s next?

With the spirit of constructing change making in mind we would like to table a capabilities challenge to American Institute of Architects as an association. Beyond provocative conversation stimulation you might want to consider creating a change making institute capacity inside AIA that in some form is capable of offering meaningful transformation help to its membership. If there is serious appetite for such an ecosystem Humantific would be happy to help AIA create such an initiative.

Perhaps this time next year will bring more to AIA membership than yet another “What’s Next” provocation.

Further Reading:

Join the NextDesign Leadership Network on LinkedIn

Into the Immeasurable: Understanding the New Umbau School of Architecture

GK VanPatter in conversation with William Tate. NextD Journal 2005

Human-Centered Innovation: Understanding the IIT Institute of Design
GK VanPatter in conversation with Patrick Whitney. NextD Journal 2004