Tag: Meta Design

30
Jun

GK VanPatter at Systemic Design

SY-Webpage

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter will give a talk on the creation of the new book: Innovation Methods Mapping / DeMystifying 80+ Years of Innovation Process Design at the upcoming Systemic Design Conference in Oslo, Norway, October 8th-11th.

In the global marketplace today there continues to be rising interest in forms of design thinking operating at the scale of complex organizational and societal changemaking.

In tandem with that interest wave there is no shortage of terms being used in the marketplace right now for design thinking at scale, including Meta Design, Systemic Design, Systems Oriented Design, Strategic Design, Meta CoCreation, Design 3 & Design 4, NextDesign Leadership, Design At Scale, Whole Systems Design, Adaptable Inquiry, Strategic CoCreation, Complexity Navigation, the OTHER Design Thinking, etc. Whatever you choose to call it evidently recognition of the need for new forms of upstream design thinking at the scale of organizations and societies has arrived.

There is now a growing community of practioner leaders and academic leaders interested in this subject that Humantific has been involved in since its founding.

Being hosted by the Oslo School of Architecture & Design the Systemic Design conference is specifically focused on “Relating systems thinking & design.”

See more here on the conference site.

Related:

When [Old Design Thinking] Love is Not Enough

NextDesign Geographies
Understanding Design 1,2,3,4

SenseMaking is Rising

NextDesign Leadership Workshops

 

 

14
Jun

Summer Workshops Coming Soon!

Hello, Friends of Humantific: Summer has arrived (in North America) and things are cooking! We have been receiving numerous requests for public Humantific workshops, so we are looking at the possibility of offering a series of sessions in various locations this summer. We are checking in with you today to coordinate possible dates and locations. Would you like to attend a Humantific workshop in New York, San Francisco, Madrid, or São Paulo? You are invited to review the following workshop information and let us know your interests asap.

Why CoCreation & Visual SenseMaking? In the rapidly changing marketplace of today, we are delighted to see cocreation, collaboration, codesign, changemaking and sensemaking being identified in every major business conference, and in many future-oriented business publications, as key leadership skills for 2013 and the emerging future. Ahead of the curve? Waiting for tomorrow? No need to wait. The curve has arrived!

Humantific Workshops: Humantific’s Complexity Navigation Program is specifically designed for organizational leaders, who seek to rapidly skill-up their innovation-related leadership skills. The program is modular, flexible, and customizable, depending on the needs of yourself and your organization. Click here for more information on the complete program. Skills are immediately useful in every country, industry, and organizational context.

1. Strategic CoCreation Introduction Workshop
One day:
July 23, 2013 (NYC)
$700 ($650 with early registration)

The Strategic CoCreation Introduction is both a mind-awakening experience as well as a learning/skills development workshop. Exploring the language of innovation involves learning individual and group innovation skills at a tabletop level (i.e., the tools and behaviors). Participants experience the art and science of creative problem solving and learn about their own individual styles. The skills learned in WorkshopONE are general innovation process skills.

A Small Fraction of What You Learn:
– Introductory Cross Disciplinary CoCreation Skills
– The Language of CoCreation
– How Team Dynamics Connect to Innovation
– Innovation / Collaboration Behaviors
– How Not to Kill Innovation

Click here for further explanation on the nature of this workshop.

2. Strategic CoCreation Advanced Facilitation Workshop
Four days:
July 23-26, 2013 (NYC)
$2,600
($2,500 with early registration)

Designed to deepen your understanding of cross-disciplinary innovation and the toolbox introduced in the Strategic CoCreation Introduction Workshop. Participants significantly advance their co-creation, creative problem solving process mastery in a positive, supportive environment. Master meeting roles and learn how to lead through proces mastery, rather than through content knowledge. Emphasis is on challenge framing mastery on the front end of complex multidimensional fuzzy situations. Participants advance their skills regarding the facilitation of cross-functional teams and small groups. Includes practice of challenge mapping on real issues.

A Small Fraction of What You Learn:
– Advanced CoCreation Facilitation Skills
– Upstream Challenge Mapping
– How to Defuzz Complex Situations
– Mastery of All Meeting Role Behaviors
– Advanced Team Dynamics Leadership

3. Visual SenseMaking Workshop
One day:
July 31, 2013 (NYC)
$700
($650 with early registration)

This full-day session explores the fundamentals of Visual SenseMaking and its direct application in solving organizational challenges. You will learn to draw a visual toolkit, which you will use to construct basic concept models. To practice these newfound skills, you will tackle a work-related challenge through a series of focused lessons and guided, step-by-step exercises. No previous experience or formal drawing skill is necessary.

A Small Fraction of What You Learn:
– Introductory Visual SenseMaking Skills
– Basic Frameworks for Visual Modeling
– A Simple Repeatable Visual SenseMaking Process
– Today – Tomorrow Diagramming
– How Visual Sensemaking Connects to Innovation

Click here for further explanation on the nature of this workshop.

 

07
Jun

MAKING SENSE OF: “Creative Intelligence”

What Seasoned Innovation Leaders Already Know!

Since the term Creative Intelligence” has reresurfaced in the mainstream business media recently with considerable hype, we thought this might be a good moment to post a few points of clarification for our Humantific readers – many of whom are innovation initiative leaders inside organizations, engaged in continous learning and innovation capacity building. To do that work effectively understanding some innovation history is useful.

Unless you are just discovering the subject of Creative Intelligence, you will probably know that, by the late 1950s and early 60s, Alex Osborn, JP Guildford, Eugene Brunelle, Sid Parnes and others in the applied creativity community (also known as the CPS community) were already connecting creative intelligence to creative behaviors and to creative problem solving process mastery.

The notion that everyone has the capacity to be creative was brought forth and championed by numerous pioneers in the applied creativity community, including Alex Osborn, Sid Parnes and JP Guilford beginning in the late 1940s.Continue Reading..

24
May

Design For Care Published

We are delighted to see the NextD Complexity Ladder utilized in the just published book Design For Care, authored by Peter Jones PhD.

Always interested in the application of NextDesign, Design at Scale, Systemic Design, ie: design thinking in the context of large scale systems, Peter uses the NextD Complexity Ladder to set the context for the scale of challenges found in healthcare today.

With the NextD Complexity Ladder as an assessment backdrop Peter points out the still growing recognition that different kinds of design thinking skill are required to address different scales of challenges. We call this skill-to-scale.

Inspired by the NextDesign Geographies vision?

If you have a project in which you would like to use the NextD Complexity Ladder materials and logic feel free to write to us at kickitup at nextd dot org.

Related

When [Old Design Thinking] Love is Not Enough

Understanding Design 1,2,3,4
The Rise of Visual SenseMaking

SenseMaking is Rising

NextDesign Geographies

Occupy Reimagining Design

Join the ongoing NextD conversations on LinkedIn NextD Leadership Network.

18
Apr

Innovation Methods Mapping Preview

Two + years in the making, Humantific, in concert with OPEN Innovation Consortium is sharing the preview version of the new book:

Innovation Methods Mapping / DeMystifying 80 Years of Innovation Process Design.

If you would like to send us a comment, or be placed on the pre-order list for the print version of the book please feel free to leave a comment below and or email: methodsmapping (at) openinnovationconsortium (dot) org

OVERVIEW
This workbook presents a new kind of methods analysis framework applied to 50 innovation process models spanning a period of 80+ years. Embedded in the framework is a new form of innovation process literacy, designed to enhance understanding of historical and current process models, as well as inform future process design.

PROJECT PURPOSE
This study has been created and shared for educational purposes.

This book is designed to fill what the consortium perceives to be a void in the field of innovation process knowledge.

As an OPEN Innovation Consortium initiative, the goal of this book project is to help move the art, science and design of innovation process modeling forward into the 21st century.

ABOUT OPEN INNOVATION CONSORTIUM
See Open Innovation Consortium in the Initiatives section of this Humantific website.

To receive information on other Humantific projects, events and initiatives feel free to subscribe to Humantific Quarterly.

19
Nov

Elizabeth Pastor at ESADE in Barcelona

Humantific CoFounder Elizabeth Pastor will be in Barcelona November 29 doing a two hour Introductory Visual SenseMaking Workshop for the ESADE Alumni Innovation Club. Organized by ESADE Alumni and open only to its membership. See how Humantific applies Visual SenseMaking to real-life business challenges. See how onboarding Visual SeneMaking capacity can fuel adaptability & agility in your organization.

If you would like to attend a future Humantific workshop in Madrid, Barcelona or New York send an email to programs (at) humantific (dot) com.

19
Nov

Elizabeth Pastor at ICADE in Madrid

Beginning Tuesday Nov 20, Humantific CoFounder, Elizabeth Pastor is in Madrid teaching cross-disciplinary Strategic CoCreation skills to MBA students at ICADE, one of Spain’s leading Business and Economics Universities. In the social business economy today we see interest in innovation, collaboration and sensemaking rising in every country and industry.

Strategic CoCreation skill-building is part of Humantific’s Complexity Navigation Program. These are 21st century leadership skills taught in experiencial workshops. It is a very different kind of experience from reading case studies! See how onboarding Complexity Navigation capacity can fuel adaptability & agility in your organization.

To inquire about having Humantific teach cross-disciplinary innovation skills, nextdesign thinking skills, complexity navigation skills in your organization or graduate program send an email to programs (@) humantific (dot) com

08
Aug

Out of Balance Competition Launches

Humantific is delighted to announce our international competition collaboration with Magazine ARCH+ and Bauhaus Dessau Foundation.

OUT OF BALANCE  – CRITIQUE OF THE PRESENT
Information Design after Otto Neurath

Prize Money: 20,000 Euros

Sponsors: Autodesk, Humantific, M:AI Museum für Architektur und Ingenieurkunst

The Topic
“1. Societal processes are presently emerging that make a balancing of social inequalities ever more unlikely and that pose a serious danger that society will drift apart, both on the global and national level and on the regional and local level. People are born into socio-spatial circumstances. Their chances in life vary in the extreme because of this “randomness”. In the interest of social integration and in accordance with democracy’s postulate of equality, modern societies embody the promise of an equalization of living circumstances. This is a guarantee for the political stability of a community. So it is not only permitted, but clearly necessary to ask about the fulfillment of this political desideratum. That means to ask what social reality actually looks like; to ask about the balance of a 30-year phase of ne liberal economy on a global level; to ask what effects deregulation and the privatization of state tasks and the restructuring of the social systems in Europe have had; and to ask how the unleashing of the global financial industry affects above all the economically weak.

Cities have always been the sites of migrants’ hopes for survival and the improvement of their situations, but they are also sites of organized defensiveness, inequality, and exclusion. The urbanization of world society is an accelerating process.

In the 21st century, for the first time in the history of humankind, more people live in cities than in rural environments, with unpredictable and initially catastrophic consequences for both rural and urban areas. In the megalopolises of the Third World and emerging countries, the social conditions of 19th-century Europe are resurfacing in potentiated form. At the same time, these processes affect the “old” world by means of streams of capital, goods, and migrants, creating new imbalances and disadvantages there. Starting with the financial markets, a system of organized irresponsibility has spread that not only exacerbates social differences, but also consciously exploits them for private advantages.

We live in a time that must be newly surveyed – in social terms and as the basis for a new societal consensus. Coming back to “real things” is the precondition for this.”

“2. Today, the difficulty of empirically describing reality no longer lies in a lack of information, but, quite the contrary, in the constantly growing amount of data that make it difficult to draw an overall picture of society and to distinguish between what is important and what is unimportant. Today we have access to an unencompassable wealth of data, much of it automatically generated: statistics, personal data, photos, documents, etc. Hardly anything seems able to elude this universal visibility in the digital age. At the same time, the present is increasingly more opaque. There are precise data for more and more questions of detail, but it is getting harder to find orientation and gain an overview of the present; the quantitative description of phenomena is getting denser, but understanding of the underlying relations and processes seems to be vanishing. Considering that all societal activity depends on information, the wealth of data poses a real dilemma; we can indeed speak of a “digital opacity”. Automated processing with the aid of programs that autonomously view, order, and evaluate data in no way automatically creates transparency.

A situation arises in which political activity is not empirically verifiable and is dissolved in politically exploitable contradictions.

Information design is more than a collection of data: information design uses data to create statements that provide insights into societal circumstances. Information design reveals connections behind the surface of the phenomena. Information design provides orientation. It creates a hierarchy of information based on relevance and content. It reduces complexity, thereby creating an overview.

Information design is not neutral. The shaping of information is influenced by the interest in knowledge. An enlightening, emancipatory information design reveals facts that are repressed, not spoken of, or forgotten, but that are nonetheless essential for understanding the present. And it thereby influences the perspective of societal activity. The image of the world we make for ourselves determines how we act.”

Possible Thematic Fields Include:
“Urban processes/spatial transformations like urbanization, segregation, deterioration into slums, gentrification, pollution, etc.

Global streams of financial capital, goods and raw materials, the outsourcing of production, human migratory movements, etc.

The task of the competition takes up the thread of the picture-pedagogical work of Otto Neurath. With his method of pictorial statistics, he developed effective forms of visually preparing data and implementing them in informational graphics that make it easier to grasp societal conditions and processes.”

Participants:
“The competition is directed towards:

Members of the design disciplines: information design, architecture, urban and regional planning, environmental planning, graphic design, product design, media design, photography, film, visual arts.

Scientists in the disciplines art and cultural studies, art education, information sciences and communication studies, social sciences, economics, environmental and geoscience, ethnography, statistics, cartography.

Students in both areas. Collaboration in interdisciplinary teams with both designers and scientists is recommended.”

Exhibition and Publication
“The competition submissions will be published by the competition’s organizers and exhibited in the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin in Autumn 2013.”

Jury:
Heinz Bude, Social Scientist/Economist
Joost Grootens, Graphic Artist
Sabine Kraft, Editor ARCH+
Joachim Krausse, Cultural Scientist
Philipp Oswalt, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation
Philippe Rekacewicz, Geographer/Cartographer
Simon Rogers, The Guardian
Christian Weiss, Autodesk
GK VanPatter, Humantific
Ursula Kleefisch-Jobs, M:AI

Procedure
“Inscription from August 15, till November 12, 2012
Submission of the works by January 31, 2013 (postmark).”

Find Project Partners Online
“Starting August 15, 2012 for initiating cooperation between designers and scientists in interdisciplinary teams.”

Learning from Otto Neurath
“The task of the competition takes up the thread of the picture-pedagogical work of Otto Neurath. With his method of pictorial statistics, he developed effective forms of visually preparing data and implementing them in informational graphics that make it easier to grasp societal conditions and processes. For Otto Neurath – the co-founder of the Vienna Circle and central proponent of logical empiricism – statistics were a central source for the scientific description of society and the economy. But description was in no way his sole interest. The content gained from the data also conveyed the demand to participate in shaping the present and in securing an imaginable future. Neurath trusted the latent political message of numbers and made it his task to make them “speak” and to make them accessible to those they most concern.

In the twenty years in which it was elaborated – 1925 to 1945 – the Vienna Method of pictorial statistics went through numerous transformations and expansions, without abandoning its principles. This mutability manifested itself, first, in applicability to disparate thematic areas; second, in the expansion of its effective scope from the local to the global; third, in the internationalization of language and pictorial language (from the Vienna Method to ISOTYPE); and fourth, in the adaptation of the graphic signs to changing media, including the moving image of film. The clarity of the concept’s principles and its openness suggest that we concern ourselves again with Neurath’s approach to information design.

Today, more data are at our disposal than ever before; but precisely the growing plethora of data raises questions. How can meaningful information be extracted from the sea of data? How can one meet the desire for legibility, coherence, and orientation? What actual situations remain unobserved or under-illuminated, despite the wealth of data? Something else has developed: the spectrum of the digital processing of information permits animated depictions and interactive forms of communication. Viewers are involved in generating data and become potential co-designers of the information design. In the face of the demands placed today on interface design, the significance of Otto Neurath’s contribution to information design is clear. Material and technical means have meanwhile developed enormously.”

With this competition, we are seeking ways in which Neurath’s concepts of data visualization can be adapted for the capabilities and needs of today’s world.

Official Announcement
“See announcement in detail in German and English at
ARCH+  or Bauhaus Dessau Foundation

Note: Complete competition descriptions, dates and directions are available in German and English on the ARCH+ site.

Related Inspiration:
Before, During & After Isotype
Isotype Building Bridges
Making Sense of Industries

26
Jun

Humantific teaches at MBA Program

Humantific CoFounder, Elizabeth Pastor has been teaching cross-disciplinary strategic cocreation skills in one of Spain’s leading Business and Economics Universities, ICADE in Madrid. Elizabeth is teaching in the Executive MBA Program. Students are organizational leaders from diverse backgrounds and industries.

To learn more about how to tap into the teaching power of Humatific send an email to programs (@) humantific (dot) com

05
Jun

Humantific & FutureBankingLab

[slideshow id=50]

All organizational leaders, perhaps especially those in the financial services industry, are facing enormous continous change today. For more than a year, Humantific has been working with the The Inter-American Development Bank’s FutureBankingLab designing and delivering a traveling proactive Beyond Banking Program.

The FutureBankingLab is essentially a multi-disciplinary, global think tank formed by institutions and experts in different areas of banking. It travels around the globe involving many stakeholders in structured dialogue.

Its purpose is to explore challenges and opportunties accross the global banking system at this time of great change. One of its functions is to promote sustainable governance principles that will empower the industry to thrive in a challenging future.

Having kicked off the program last year in Cologne, Germany, Humantific was recently invited back to lead the facilitation of another round of sessions in Madrid, this time focused on developing strategies to fund “The Missing Middle” in Latin America and the Caribbean’s financial sector, in  collaboration with IDB, BBVA (Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria) and the MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund).