Tag: Innovation

05
Oct

2022 Future Work Skills Outlook

Innovation, Problem Solving, Learning Rising!

The World Economic Forum has published its updated 2022 Skills Outlook. Since we are involved in and focused on the future of work we were delighted to see so much of what we do at Humantific on the new “Growing” list including: Innovation, Complex Problem Solving, Creativity, Leadership, Critical Thinking, Emotional Intelligence, Analysis and Ideation.

We like to keep an eye of several versions of Future Work Skills Outlooks as we are actively involved in the Future Work Skills Academy.

See the 2020 Future Work Skills here! It also includes Complex Problem Solving, Creativity, Critical Thinking, Emotional Intelligence and one we really like, Cognitive Flexibility.

We also liked this Future Work Skills 2020 Report from the Institute for the Future in California.

To learn more about how we help organizations get ready for the rapidly arriving future by skilling up in Innovation Leadership, Complex Problem Solving and activating Organizational Transformation send us an email: kickitup (at) humantific (dot) com.

See some Humantific Case Studies here:

21
Aug

Humantific at Google New York City

Elizabeth Pastor Presents!

Humantific CoFounder Elizabeth Pastor gave an informal Humantific talk today at Google here in New York City.

Lots of interest in the NextDesign Geographies Framework… Design 1,2,3,4.

Lots of interest in Upstream and Downstream methods.

Lots of interest in learning more about how to bring understanding of cognitive/thinking styles into cross-disciplinary team consciousness.

If you would like Elizabeth to come and give an inspirational Humantific talk to your in-house group on topics such as SenseMaking for ChangeMaking, Building Inclusive Innovation Culture, Upstream Challenge Framing, or Rethinking Design Thinking, feel free to send us an email: kickitup (at) humantific (dot) com.

If you are an organizational leader and would like to join our Friends of Humantific LinkedIn Group feel free to send us an email. 🙂

14
May

Osborn’s Lost SCAMPER

Reappreciating Applied Imagination

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter posts to his LinkedIn blog:

Hello again Humantific readers. Inspired by a reoccurring question seen in one of the LinkedIn Design Thinking discussion groups regarding “SCAMPER” we decided to make this the focus of this week’s post. Since many of our readers/clients are innovation initiative leaders we thought it might be useful to you if we share a somewhat lost story regarding this thinking related subject.

At Humantific we recognize SCAMPER as a basic idea prompting technique, (not a method) with a long history that seems to be not well understood in some communities of practice today.

SCAMPER originates in the Applied Creativity community (*1), not the design or design thinking communities. For those who might not know these are two very different communities of knowledge…with very different timelines, heroes, orientation to challenges and methodology histories. While many parallels exist, one is certainly not interchangeable with the other…….

The Edison Effect

It might come as a surprise to some unfamiliar with Osborn’s work or that of the various other United States based CPS/Applied Creavity pioneers but the early orientation of this community can be described as significantly influenced by the Edison Effect….as in Thomas Edison (1847-1931). Without getting into the later criticism leveled at Edison we can acknowledge for the purposes of this post that he was a prolific, highly influential legendary American Inventor…..

See the entire post here: Osborn’s Lost SCAMPER: ReAppreciating Applied Imagination

 

30
Aug

Ambidexterity Continuum

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Getting the Conversation Started

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter posts to his LinkedIn blog:

Hello again Humantific readers. This week we are returning to our Secrets of Innovation Series by sharing an overview of the Ambidexterity Continuum and how we use it conversationally. It’s a simple device that can be powerful in initial conversations.

As many of our readers will know: we often work with organizational leaders who are encountering complex marketplace dynamics that lead them in one way or another to find their way into the subject of what today is often called Operational Dexterity, Ambidexterity or Dual Engine strategy. We find that most often leaders arrive into the subject through the complex challenges they are encountering rather then via academic literature or theories.

Some of our readers will know that Harvard Business Review and The IBM Institute for Business Value, among others have, in recent years, published articles on the subject of ambidexterity in organizations attempting to make some of the more academically inclined research/literature a little more user friendly to business audiences.

“In uncertain environments, organizational ambidexterity appears to be positively associated with increased firm innovation, better financial performance and higher survival rates.” Charles O’Reilly & Michael Tushman. Organizational Ambidexterity; Past, Present and Future.

One of the most important lessons is that ambidextrous organizations need ambidextrous senior teams and managers—executives who have the ability to understand and be sensitive to the needs of very different kinds of businesses.” Charles O’Reilly & Michael Tushman, The Ambidextrous Organization.

More recently it has been interesting to see several global management consultancies including Accenture, Deloitte and Bain & Company also arrive into the subject publishing point-of-view papers suggesting firms of the future will have underlying ambidextrous operating strategies.

“We’re beginning to see what the next generation of successful companies will look like….The firm of the future will manage two types of businesses—“Engine 1” of its core and “Engine 2” of its more innovative businesses.” Bain & Company 2017.

…..As a next generation of leaders arrive we are seeing significant interest in ambidexterity as it relates to inclusive culture building.

Ultimately leaders come to the realization that ambidexterity is not an abstraction but rather is representational cognitively of collective and inclusive us. For diverse organizations ambidexterity is home.

See the entire post here:

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09
Aug

Virtual Visual SenseMaking

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In the Recording Studio

Humantific’s E. Pastor and GK. VanPatter having a few laughs working in the studio recording the new Visual SenseMaking virtual course as part of the new Future Work Skills Academy in collaboration with our friends at 4th Industrial Revolution.

Big thanks to Donna Eiby for all her amazing guidance and support in this new adventure. Designing and delivering virtual learning programs is hard work!

Virtual Visual SenseMaking Coming Soon!

Send us an email if you would like to be advised when this program launches. kickitup (at) humantific (dot) com

 

31
Jan

Transformations is Published

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More on Transformation By Design

Congrats to Emma Jefferies, Joyce Tee and Kamil Michlewski on the publication of their new book Transformations / 7 Roles to Drive Change by Design. We are delighted to be included in this new book examining how design/design thinking is changing…indeed has already changed!

“Tracking how design has changed in previous book Design Transitions has inevitably led the authors to explore how organisations are changing using design. Design is now the key driver of innovation and change within organisations across the globe. It is therefore important to learn how, when and why to use design to drive change in your organisation.

Transformations documents how design is being used to support change across different organisations, countries and sectors, sharing the stories of experts in their fields at varying stages of their transformative journeys.”

“Expert Interviews” include:

GK VanPatter: Humantific / USA

Peter Coughlan: Consultant / USA

Mark Vernooj: THNK/ The Netherlands

Mariana Amatullo: Design Matters / USA

Brenton Caffin: Nesta / United Kingdom

Christian Bason: Danish Design Center / Denmark

Beatriz Lara Bartolomé: Imersivo / Spain

Transformations / 7 Roles to Drive Change by Design.

27
Jan

Ambidexterity Skill-Building

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Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter writes about the state of “Firm of The Future” Skill-Building. Ambidexterity often appears in numerous depictions of the arriving future originating in the managagement consulting community. What is missing from that picture?

“Hello Humantific readers. In this post we return to the subject of ambidexterity in organizations. The recent report entitled “The Firm of the Future” from Bain & Company is one of the latest management advisory publications pointing out the importance of and shift towards operationalizing ambidexterity in future focused organizations.

“We’re beginning to see what the next generation of successful companies will look like….The firm of the future will manage two types of businesses—“Engine 1” of its core and “Engine 2” of its more innovative businesses.” Bain & Company 2017.

Accenture, Deloitte, Bain & Company, Detecon and others have all recently been offering up similar observations and advice to organizational leaders. Others such as Charles O’Reilly & Michael Tushman of Harvard Business School writing in Harvard Business Review have previously written on the subject reflecting their own research. It is a capacity referred to under different names that include Ambidexterity, Dual Engines, Exploiting/Exploring, Double Excellence, Dual Innovation, Integrative Innovation, etc. With numerous different takes on the subject now tabled, some more practical then others, what they are all talking about is the notion of future oriented firms enabling two engines or streams of innovation, each with different characteristics.”

Read the entire post on LinkedIn here.

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03
Aug

Making Sense of Design Thinking

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Making Sense of Design Thinking & “Agile” Method

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter just published another post in his popular ongoing “Making Sense Series.”

“Many organizational leaders have become a tad confused as various parties pitch methods in a competitive marketplace that now includes the graduate business schools and graduate design schools seeking to reposition themselves as innovation advisory consultancies..:-)”

“In this brief post, with an objective towards advocating clarity, we share how, from a practice based methods perspective, Humantific differentiates between Design Thinking methods, Product/Service/Experience Design Thinking methods and Agile methods. While they all add value, they each add different forms of value applicable to different contexts.

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Read the post on LinkedIn here:

Related:

Making Sense of “Why Design Thinking Will Fail.”

Building Strategic Innovation Lab Capabilities

Enabling Organizational Ambidexterity

11
Nov

Making Sense of Strategic Design 2015

Talking up SenseMaking

[Part 2 of 3]

Ana Barroso in Conversation with GK VanPatter

Ana Barroso: Welcome back to Part 2 of this conversation GK. Here in Latin America we are seeing rising interest in the subject of sensemaking, maybe because we have a lot of complicated things going on here!

One of the layers of findings you apply to the NextD Geographies framework has to do with the toolboxes that are increasingly more complex and cross disciplinary in Design 3 and 4. What skills does it take to conduct a visual sensemaking process? Do you believe a non-designer, without formal academic training, can make a good 3.0 or 4.0 design thinker or sensemaker? Can you describe the process of capacity building Humantific does in its innovation capacity programs?

Continue Reading..

27
Oct

Humantific & the City of Austin

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The Humantific team is excited to be back in Austin, Texas this week to work with the forward thinking City of Austin’s Civic Innovation Team on building adaptable civic innovation leadership capacity.

Many cities are realizing that there is a role for city governments in inspiring, supporting and leading innovation in their local communities. One result is significant interest from city government leaders in acquiring next generation innovation leadership skills for the specific context of complex civic challenges.

Continue Reading..