Tag: Applied Creativity

22
Apr

Design Thinking Made Visible Project

 

For those interested in the subjects of Integrative Thinking, Organizational Transformation, Reinvention of Design, Constructing Inclusion, Thinking Diversity, Design 3.0, 4.0, Visual SenseMaking, Strategic CoCreation, Design Thinking, Innovation Harmonics:

Humantific has published the Design Thinking Made Visible Project as part of our virtual book series. It provides a glimpse into Humantific’s ongoing Integrative Thinking Research Initiative underway for ten years and models how design thinking has already been reinvented to better serve as enabler of organizational and societal transformation.

This chapter of research provides a window into Humantific’s Design Thinking Made Visible research in progress in collaboration with numerous universities around the world.

This research project was designed as a collective sensemaking exercise that could be undertaken in undergraduate or graduate schools by professors and students without any special design thinking or innovation process mastery training provided.

Shown here are actual design process drawings, made by 5 groups of students in 5 schools, as well as their class innovation profiles.

Participating Schools Shown in this book:

Domus Academy, Italy

Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark

National Institute for Design, India

University of Kassel, Germany

Regents Business School, UK

(Other schools are in progress)

Included in the book is a glimpse into how Humantific enables Integrative Thinking in organizations utilizing its Innovation Harmonics Framework.

Creating Innovation Harmonics in organizations begins with raising awareness that thinking differences exist. Making Thinking Visible represents one stream of Humantifc work.

Book Contents

Introduction

What is Integrative Thinking?

What is Integrative Thinking Enabling?

Design Thinking Made Visible Project

Research Results

What the Research Shows

Integrative Thinking: In History

Included in the book:

What The Research Shows: 10 Key Findings:

Finding 1

This research predates and debunks the 2009 academic theory that thinking attributes (“reliability”, “validity”, etc) can be rigidly pre-assigned to individuals or teams based on discipline labels such as design, designer or business, business manager.

Finding 2

Some students in design schools have the same thinking preferences as some students in business schools and vice-versa.

Finding 3

Professors and students are generally unaware of how radically different design process approaches are from one person to another.

Finding 4

Many students of design/innovation are not accustomed to externalizing their thinking process.

Finding 5

For numerous students in this study, design thinking jumps off from a framed problem defined by a brief. Often there was no process activity upstream from the brief.

Finding 6

Design thinking processes often appear very different visually while similar fundamental steps can often be found within. Some steps appear universal, others situational.

Finding 7

Most design thinking processes seen here have assumptions embedded that outcomes will be product or service creation.

Finding 8

Most design thinking process models seen in this study contain no reference to behaviors.

Finding 9

This research makes visible why the orchestration of design innovation work remains complex and a key challenge for teams and organizations.

Finding 10

This research suggests that real tools and visually shareable results are extremely useful in moving understanding and dialogue regarding integrative thinking beyond stereotypical notions of design thinking and business thinking.

The Design Thinking Made Visible Project is intended to inform and inspire dialogue regarding the realities of Design Thinking and Integrative Thinking by Design already underway in organizations today.

To inquire about participating in Humantific’s Thinking Made Visible Research send an email to thinkingresearch (at) humantific (dot) com.

08
Jun

Humantific at IDSA in Miami

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter will give a keynote talk on SenseMaking for ChangeMaking at the 2009 IDSA International Conference upcoming in Miami on September 23-26.

About the conference:

“Our global economy is going through dramatic change. Design can be proactive and guide change. We can be a significant influence in creating new value. It has been said that the future is not something that happens…it is something that you make happen. Business is not asking for our help to drive new value, they are demanding it. In the 30s, design helped the economy out of the depression. We are finding ourselves at a moment of opportunity once again. Designers have the tools to create new value for reviving economies.

Project Infusion is a new format for IDSA’s International Conference, which will be held at the Loews Miami Beach Hotel September 23-26. Both domestic and international attendees across diverse disciplines beyond the confines of the IDSA membership are invited to exchange ideas, opinions and insights. This is a project that we will contribute to mutually. We will enjoy its fruits together.

Fresh infusion of inspiration, knowledge and wisdom will fuel our creativity. This will be the process of steeping and soaking substance in order to extract new viewpoints. It will be an exchange of ideas that you will want to bring your boss to, or send your employees to. You will learn how to increase your bottom line and that of your business.

See more on the conference site.

01
Feb

How to Think UP! 1942

 

In the Humantific Innovation Archives, we have many of the early books and papers from the history of creative thinking, applied imagination, applied creativity, creative problem solving, systems thinking, human intelligence, learning styles, structure of the intellect, etc.

From time to time we will post a few examples here, as these early materials contain many gems in spite of the fact that the world has changed a great deal since they first appeared.

This book How to Think UP, by Alex Osborn, is an early example, as it was published in 1942.

For those interested in understanding such history, these books are wonderful windows into the early thinking based on the context that existed at that time.

At Humantific, we have great respect for this early work, as we all stand on the shoulders of this history whether we know it or not. :-) Written at a different time, we do not have to agree with everything in the materials to appreciate these works.

The early pioneers of creative thinking methods were primarily focused on jumpstarting idea creation, and not on complex challenge/opportunity framing—not on the research and visual sense-making that would now occur as part of framing.

Seeking to encourage imagination, many of these early works are incredibly optimistic regarding American ingenuity and the challenges facing the country and the world. Here, one can see the seeds of the early “everyone can be creative” philosophy, where it came from, and how it was first applied.

Here are a few quotes from How to Think UP:

“When necessity reaches a crisis, the crisis cries out for ideas. American ingenuity is rising to the challenge.”

“Some of life’s stony problems can be cleared away by outside science, others by judgment, but most of them by ideas.”

“Ideas are the priceless keys to good living.”

“The more ideas we can think up, the more satisfying our lives will be.”

“Even old folks can think up things when they try.”

“There is no royal road to creation. The production of ideas can never be a science but will always be an art.”

“Too many employers just ask for ideas without specifying what about. Occasionally a problem is assigned, and ideas are asked for within that limit. Or employees are set to work in a group and asked to think up together. But, by and large, rank-and-file people are nearly always invited simply to pick their own subject and to do their brain-storming on their own.”

“Who can think up ideas? You and every other normally intelligent person. But you have to try.”

“Everybody loves to be a critic or a judge. Judicial judgment calls for no great mental sweat.”

“Ideas more than luck will land the job you want.”

And the all time classic: “If you can’t originate an idea, think up how someone else’s good idea can be turned into a better idea.”

Of course, it is equally interesting to reflect upon the context in which these early works were created.

In the introduction, by Bruce Barton of Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn Inc., he writes: “There is so little literature that might help Americans in their endeavor to think up more ideas for the war effort that I persuaded Mr. Osborn to send this manuscript to a publisher. I hope a large number will be circulated in American offices and plants.”

While some innovation consultants remain focused, even today, on ideation techniques, most operating in the realm of organizational and social change understand that much more is now required.

We are, at Humantific, always interested in the past, present and future of innovation. One of our internal projects underway involves researching and constructing a visual timeline that combines the history of the applied creativity movement and the history of the design thinking movement. If anyone else out there is working on such projects please feel free to let us know.

Image Source: Osborn, Alex. How to Think Up! New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Book, First Edition, Second Impression, 1942. Humantific Collection, New York.

19
Jan

Interactive Innovation Profile

NextDesign Leadership Institute in partnership with Basadur Applied Creativity have launched a new interactive innovation profile. Next generation innovation leaders know the importance of having access to new insight tools in order to understand and effectively lead cross-disciplinary teams. If you would like to know more about this interactive tool view the mini presentation: See Deeper / Think Smarter on the NextD site.

17
Jan

GK VanPatter Collaborates with Microsoft

IMG_1602

In collaboration with Microsoft and their Experience Expression road show launching Expression Studio, GK VanPatter gave talks in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver on NextDesign Geographies (Design 1,2,3,4) and the transformation underway in the design community. Road show presenters included David Crow and Rini Gahir of Microsoft and Danny Riddell of Metaliq. Thanks to Nicole Flippance and Michael MacMillan of High Road Communications for their logistical support.

The Buzz:

Microsoft Canada Expression Launch

Microsoft Launches Expression Studio

Microsoft Expression launch event at Canvas Lounge with GK VanPatter
(and Silverlight)

Canadians having an an impact on design

04
Jan
03
Jan