Tag: Beyond Service Design

16
Dec

Visual SenseMaking Glimpse Rocks!

Humantific CoFounder, Elizabeth Pastor taught a Visual SenseMaking Workshop at Istituto Europeo di Design in Madrid on November 22. Open to the public and co-sponsored with IED’s Masters of Design and Innovation Program, this Glimpse session was designed to be a quick introduction to the subject of Humantific’s Visual SenseMaking. The session, which was sold out, focused on how it differs from other visual thinking approaches and techniques, and how it applies to real world creative problem solving. Through several lessons and exercises, the participants learned:

  • To develop their own toolkit to communicate ideas visually
  • Techniques to build your visual vocabulary and construct visual models
  • Basic frameworks for visual modeling applied to specific scenarios

Stay tuned for news about more Glimpse sessions in New York and San Francisco!

Interested in Future Workshops?
Humantific conducts cross-disciplinary innovation skill-building on an ongoing basis with organizations globally. If you would like to consider bringing Humantific to your organization to help with your innovation skill-building and strategic thinking for leaders, contact us: engage (at) humantific (dot) com

See more:
Humantific’s Visual SenseMaking Workshops
Humantific at the BBC
Humantific Strategy Session

26
Oct

Teaching Co-Creation Now

Continuing its ReReThinking Design series, NextDesign Leadership Institute has published a new virtual book: “Teaching Co-Creation Now” which makes transparent several long-brewing but seldom-talked-about graduate design education challenges. Like most NextD material, this story reflects considerable synthesis after years of listening to NextD Academy workshop participants and many visiting graduate students from around the world.

To quote the story’s author, GK VanPatter: “Not everyone is going to like the notion of defuzzing this particular subject, but when it comes to deeply understanding what the rise of cocreation really means for graduate design education, it’s getting very late. It’s possible that we have not been clear enough in some of our own earlier materials. Cross-disciplinary cocreation remains at the core of next design, whether everyone likes it or not.”

Recognizing that it’s important to walk the walk, and not just talk the talk, NextD Academy has been offering next design leadership workshops every summer since 2003. Numerous forward thinking design education leaders have attended.

Join the NextDesign Leadership Network conversations!

27
Jun

Thinking Made Visible Research

We are delighted to see so much interest in Humantific’s Integrative Thinking Research Initiative. Much to our surprise viewers of the Design Thinking Made Visible Project story have exceeded 15,000.

Posted for public viewing the research outcome included these findings:

Integrative Thinking Research: 10 Key Findings:

Finding 1
This research predates and debunks the widely publicized 2009 academic theory that thinking attributes (reliability & validity) can be rigidly pre-assigned to individuals or teams based on discipline labels such as design, designer or business, business manager. (This is a nice way of saying this was already known prior to 2009.)

Finding 2
Some students of design schools have the same thinking preferences as some students in business schools and vice-versa.

Finding 3
Professors and students are generally unaware of how radically different design process approaches are from one person to another.

Finding 4
Many students of design/innovation are not accustomed to externalizing their thinking process.

Finding 5
For numerous students in this study design thinking jumps off from a framed problem defined by a brief. Often there was no process activity upstream from the brief.

Finding 6
Design Thinking processes often appear very different visually while similar fundamental steps can often be found within. Some steps appear universal, other situational.

Finding 7
Most Design Thinking processes seen here have assumptions embedded that outcomes will be product or service creation.

Finding 8
Most design thinking process models seen in this study contain no reference to behaviors.

Finding 9
This research makes visible why the orchestration of design innovation work remains complex and a key challenge for teams and organizations.

Finding 10
This research suggests that real tools and visually sharable results are extremely useful in moving understanding of Integrative Thinking beyond stereotypical notions of design thinking and business thinking.

You can see these findings on pages 119-129 inside the Design Thinking Made Visible Project.

For “What is Integrative Thinking” see page 13-29
For “Humantific’s Innovation Harmonics” see page 18-29
For “Integrative Thinking in History” see page 131-135

Humantific has numerous streams of Thinking Made Visible Research in progress. Not all Humantific research is public. We often work with business leaders seeking to create private internal research projects focused on better understanding various aspects of their organizations “Innovation Brain”.

If your business organization or school would like to participate in one of our public or private streams of Thinking Made Visible Research send an email to thinkingresearch (at) humantific (dot) com.

27
Jun

Humantific at the BBC

Bringing Complexity Navigation Skills to the BBC in London

Humantific is working with the BBC bringing Complexity Navigation Skills to their User Experience & Design senior leadership team this summer and fall seasons.

Humantific’s Janet Getto and Elizabeth Pastor spent a week in London this past June with BBC’s User Experience & Design senior leadership team. The Strategic CoCreation program was focused on learning cross-disciplinary innovation process skills. The team was very engaged and enthusiastic and gave the whole experience a 9.1 average rating (over 10). Adam Powers, Head of User Experience & Design for Branded Experiences, had great things to say after the experience:

“Humantific were hired by BBC UX&D to deliver a four-day workshop. I am not overstating things when I say that Janet and Elizabeth’s work was transformational for the fourteen people that attended. Seismic organisational changes in BBC UX&D meant that all attendees were particularly open to new ways of thinking, problem solving and collaborating, but Humantific gave us shape and extraordinary focus. We left with practical tools and felt empowered to use them, along with a sense of shared purpose that unified a previously disconnected bunch of creatives. Many organisations can provide training in this Design thinking /Innovation space, but Janet and Elizabeth bring unique insights and approaches – and what’s more, they bring themselves. Inspirational.”

Humantific’s Elizabeth Pastor and Michael Babwahsingh will be back this fall for the second part of the program focused on Visual SenseMaking. Stay tuned!

22
Jun

NextD Workshops Registration Open!

New York City: July 26–29, 2011 (9am-6pm)

Register on nextd.eventbrite.com.

WorkshopONE: Exploring cross-disciplinary innovation now!
WorkshopTWO: Understanding cross-disciplinary innovation now!
WorkshopTHREE: Leading cross-disciplinary innovation now!

ARE YOU READY?
Are you ready to cut through all the baloney and hype around design thinking, integrative thinking, creative intelligence, and innovation? If you are ready to move beyond all the marketplace theorizing and get to work, NextD WorkshopONE is for you.

Open to professionals from all backgrounds, NextD Academy has offered WorkshopONE / Exploring Cross-Disciplinary Innovation, once every summer since 2002.

Sponsored by and taught by hybrid cocreation experts at Humantific’s StrategyLab WorkshopONE is focused on teaching fundamental skills needed to work in all cross disciplinary contexts. Humantific has many years of experience working in the trenches with organizational leaders to harness collective brain power, drive change and build sustainable innovation capacity. If you are faced in your workplace with the challenge of getting diverse disciplines to work creatively together on complex fuzzy challenges this workshop is for you. You will be introduced to a hybrid way of working applicable to all challenge types not just product or service creation.

This summer we have added the opportunity for deeper innovation leadership skill-building with WorkshopTWO and WorkshopTHREE.

If you are called upon in your work to help others frame fuzzy complex challenges and opportunities this advanced skill-building program is for you.

We find that many NextD Academy attendees are midcareer professionals who are encountering opportunities to lead hybrid teams in their work but lack concrete cross-disciplinary innovation skills. Don’t let that window close on you without success. NextD Academy workshops provide the skills to get you ready to help others regardless of challenge type and regardless of their starting points. With these advanced skills you are able to add tremendous value to any meeting, any strategy creation, any complex challenge situation.

You can register for NextD WorkshopONE or the complete 4 day program.
GET YOURSELF READY!

DESCRIPTION
WorkshopONE: Exploring Cross-Disciplinary Innovation
1 day workshop
WorkshopONE is both a mind awakening experience as well as a learning/skills development workshop. Exploring the language of innovation involves learning individual and group innovation skills at a tabletop level (i.e., the tools and behaviors). Participants experience the art and science of creative problem solving, and learn about their own individual styles. The skills learned in WorkshopONE are general innovation process skills.

WorkshopTWO: Understanding Cross-Disciplinary Innovation
1.5 day workshop
Designed to deepen your understanding of cross-disciplinary innovation and the toolbox introduced in WorkshopONE. Participants significantly advance their co-creation, creative problem solving process mastery in a positive, supportive environment. Master meeting roles and learn how to lead through process mastery rather than through content knowledge. Emphasis is on challenge framing mastery on the front end of complex multidimensional fuzzy situations.

WorkshopTHREE: Leading Cross-Disciplinary Innovation
1.5 day workshop
Designed to advance leadership skills in cross-disciplinary innovation WorkshopTHREE helps you put to practice all the learnings from WorkshopONE and TWO in a positive, supportive environment. Participants advance their skills regarding the facilitation of cross-functional teams and small groups. Includes practice of challenge mapping on real issues.

DURATION
WorkshopONE: One day
Full Program (WorkshopONE,TWO,THREE): 4 days

CLASS SIZE
To maximize learning of complex skills NextD Academy class size is typically small, most often less than 25 people.

PREREQUISITES
Positive energy and an open mind are the only prerequisites required for NextD WorkshopONE.
Completion of WorkshopONE is prerequisite for attendance of WorkshopTWO and WorkshopTHREE

 

LEARNING EXPERIENCE
All NextD workshops are designed as experiential learning journeys rather than lecture format. With the help of experienced instructors you work your way through a series of self realizations and concrete cocreation skill building.

WHY ATTEND?
It’s no secret that 21st century Social Innovation, Organizational Transformation, Innovation Acceleration all require high level mastery of cross disciplinary cocreation skills including upstream challenge framing visualization.
If you would like to learn how to work upstream from defined briefs where challenges and opportunities are unpacked and framed, this accelerated skill-building is for you.

WHAT YOU WILL GET
– Cocreation skill, skill, skill!
– Chance to learn form Humantific’s cocreation professionals
– Deeper understanding of integrative thinking, creative intelligence, cross-disciplinary innovation
– WorkshopONE, TWO & THREE Workbook
– Results of your Innovation Profile
– Innovation Toolkit pocket card
– NextD Academy Completion Certificate
– NextD “Defuzz the Future” t-shirt

FEEDBACK FROM PREVIOUS PARTICIPANTS
– “My expectations were greatly exceeded.”
– “NextD is the best articulation that I’ve seen of the future opportunity and challenges for the design professions.”
– “Had a lot of fun while learning many new skills”
– “Great experience…You have done an amazing job, and I’ve found it very inspiring.”
– “Real life examples”
– “Knowledgeable skillful delivery.”
– “I’d like to see my whole division sitting in this room and experiencing what it is to understand each other’s problem solving styles and the creative problem solving process”
– “A comprehensive approach to articulating the future role of design.”
– “I appreciate having one big conceptual bucket to help me think through all this stuff that I have been figuring out on my own.’
– “WorkshopONE provides valuable tools for tempered radicalism within a corporate culture.”
– “I learned new ways of doing and explaining what I do that I can use today.”
– “I appreciated the content, but also the opportunity to get a clearer sense of the context..”
– “WorkshopONE is a process for discovering your own process… brilliant!”
– “I appreciated meeting others working on Design 3.0, 4.0 and understanding their sense of where they are in the world.”
– “WorkshopONE solidifies concepts that I’ve explored and gives me tools to implement them.”
– “Served as both a catalyst to re-think my design approach, and as an opportunity to reinforce design principles that I hold dear.”
– “I feel a renewed excitement.”
– “WorkshopONE is essential for all teams of any discipline.”

INSTRUCTORS



Elizabeth Pastor & Janet Getto
Elizabeth and Janet are the driving forces behind Humantific’s StrategyLab.

Internationally recognized for deep knowledge of hybrid thinking and cross disciplinary cocreation Humantific works with organizational leaders in many industries.

Elizabeth is Co-Founder of Humantific. Her work involves the art, science, design and business of constructing human-centered SenseMaking systems. For more than ten years her practice and research work has been focused on the bridge between SenseMaking and ChangeMaking in organizations. Her graduate degree in design is from Art Center College of Design in California. Prior to creating Humantific Elizabeth Co-Founded Scient’s Innovation Acceleration Labs with GK VanPatter.

Janet is Director of Humantific StrategyLab. As a master of Strategic Co-Creation Facilitation she has over 20 years of successful experience helping organizational leaders drive change, solve problems that are important to them and find emerging opportunities for growth. She holds a Master of Science Degree in Industrial Relations and is relied upon as an innovation process master, facilitator, trainer and coach for executives, and teams in many industries.

Moving beyond talk to action Janet and Elizabeth have years of hands-on experience working with leadership teams on complex strategic challenges as well as innovation capacity building. They are also experienced teachers.

Working together, Janet and Elizabeth will be drawing from experience rather than academic books to teach real world cross-disciplinary cocreation skills.

See a few of many, many Humantific events here:
– New Visions, New Leaders
– Humantific at the BBC
– Markets for Giving Workshop
– CoCreating Strategy
– Complexity Navigation Program
– Integrative Thinking Research
– Summer Session 2009 Wraps
– Future Envisioning
– Humantific at DD4D in Paris
– Visual SenseMaking for Leaders
– Sustainabilitys FlipSide
– WorkshopONE Summer Session 2007
– The Rise of Visual SenseMaking

CHANGES
We reserve the right to make changes at any time within one week’s notice to location, starting time, and presenters. We reserve the right to cancel a workshop in the event of an unforeseen circumstance. In the event of a cancellation, we will refund the registration fee only.

CANCELLATION POLICY
Cancellations can be made up until 14 days before the scheduled event date and will incur a $50.00 cancellation fee. Refunds or credits will not be issued for cancellations made within 10 days of the scheduled event date. Substitutions will be accepted any time prior to the commencement of the event. Refunds or credits will not be issued for no-shows or for those who begin a course but do not complete it. If the event is cancelled all attendees will be notified via email and a refund issued. Registered participants that do not show and do not cancel will be required to pay the total course fee.

QUESTIONS?
Feel free to contact us for any questions at vmiosuro (at) humantific (dot) com

NOT ABLE TO ATTEND AT THIS TIME?
If you would like to attend this workshop but have a schedule conflict let us know and we will keep you in the loop regarding future sessions in the United States and Europe. Send email to: engage (at) humantific (dot) com

WANT TO BRING YOUR ENTIRE TEAM?
Conducting NextD Workshops is only one of many work streams at Humantific. We are doing workshop based cross-disciplinary innovation skill-building on an ongoing basis with organizations in numerous countries. If you would like to consider bringing Humantific in to your organization to help with your innovation skill-building, innovation strategy creation, strategic thinking for leaders, feel free to let us know. Send email to: engage (at) humantific (dot) com

 

 

20
May

The Power of Your Mind 1952

We love and respect innovation history. In the marketplace, we see some experts running around claiming to have invented everything from integrative thinking to various forms of innovation. To us, such claims are nonsense. We all stand on the shoulders of many smart folks who contributed much before us. Let’s respect that.

Sure, we have updated, extended, and changed much of what was done historically, integrating new knowledge, methods, and tools to address contemporary needs, but there is a lot we can learn from the various streams of innovation history.

With so much hype around innovation and creativity today, we find it useful to be aware, at a deeper level, of the history of innovation, applied creativity, creative problem solving, and design thinking. There are many overlaps in the history that are quite amazing, in retrospect.

Pictured here is a gem from the Humantific Collection. This terrific, little booklet by Alex Osborn, entitled The Power of Your Mind, was published an astonishing 59 years ago, in conjunction with his book Wake Up Your Mind (also published in 1952).

In the historical publications, one can see early acknowledgement of numerous challenges that many organizations and societies still grapple with today.

Like time capsules, the early publications on the subject of applied creativity reveal the optimism of the post-World War II era—a focus on encouraging imagination, and the application of creativity in an American business context.

In 1952, Osborn wrote, “Exercise your imagination—the more creative you become, the more you will get out of life.”

It’s not difficult to see that, as early as the 1940’s, thought leaders were trying to make the case that American business schools, and schools in general, get more serious about teaching, and encouraging imagination and creative thinking. Evidently, many educational institutions, including the business schools, did not listen to that message for a very long time.

Also revealed in the historical creative problem solving materials are the societal stereotypes of that era. In the early publications, women were often depicted as housewives engaged in creative domestic work, while men were often depicted as business-oriented workers not making effective use of their imaginations.

“Many housewives work their imaginations more than their husbands do.”

Apart from the stereotypes that now seem comical, what is interesting to see is the view into a simpler world, the emphasis on idea finding in the context of product objects, and orientation towards engineering or science. Also fascinating to see is how little some of the problems around changing behaviors, in the direction of innovation, have changed since Alex Osborn, Sidney Parnes, and others began writing about the subject decades ago.

Today, organizational leaders face a vastly more complicated world in a state of constant change. Those engaged, today, in driving organizational change or innovation-enabling understand that many organizations have built judgment-dominated cultures, and simultaneously wonder why no innovation is occurring. How to create more balanced, more innovative cultures remains among the top ten most-encountered organizational business challenges even today.

Here is a small sample of Alex Osborn’s 1952 commentary on the subject:

“The thinking mind finds it easier to judge than to create. Nearly all of our education tends to develop our critical faculty. And our experience likewise builds up our judgment…The more we exercise our judgment, the less likely we are to exercise our imagination. By overuse of our judicial power we may even cramp our creative power.”

“Loss of imagination can be even more deplorable than loss of musculation… We can get along with less brawn in our later years but to surmount the obstacles which age piles in our paths we need more than seasoned judgment, we need well trained imagination.”

“When it comes to business, ideas are almost everything. Their value can often exceed that of any asset on any financial statement.”

Also, in the early 1950-era materials, one can see concern expressed that America was losing its creative edge—perhaps a timeless topic!

“There are many signs that Yankee ingenuity is on the wane — not because we are born with less creative talent, but because we no longer try hard enough to use the talent that is in us… Our softer living numbs our sense of enterprise and deadens our creative spirit.”

With the internet now enabling global interaction, and with it built-in judgment functionality, we are interested in how present-day and emerging technologies might serve to repair, balance, and address several deeply rooted human innovation challenges that have existed for generations.

Being aware of the history of education and innovation helps us and our client partners think about such issues in a context beyond the flavor trend of the moment.

Image Source: The Power of Your Mind. Chicago: National Research Bureau, 1952. Humantific Collection, New York.

(Originally posted in June 2009. Its a classic!)

05
May

Thoughts on AIGA’s One Day For Design

Since a lot of what we do here at Humantific is upstream strategy cocreation with organizations as part of changemaking initiatives, we were somewhat puzzled to see how AIGA (formerly American Institute of Graphic Arts), a professional graphic design association seeking to reposition itself, undertook a one day Twitter event on April 13th entitled “One Day For Design” (1D4D). The session was promoted with intriguing prompters including “What if you had one day to alter the future of design”.

From a cocreation perspective we could not help but notice that the 1D4D event seemed to contain a veritable smorgasbord of large scale, highly complex, some might say conflicting framing messages. This entanglement seemed to be combined with additional mixed messages around what the dialogue type was intended to be. How the complexity of the subject to be addressed and the intended dialogue type connected to the technology platform chosen was of equal mystery.

Among the complex simultaneous topics posed by AIGA for the 1D4D session on Twitter were: “The meaning of design, The future of design, The meaning of professional design associations, and The future of professional design associations.”

We noticed that 1D4D participants had wildly differing perspectives on session purpose and dialogue expectations. Some participants thought the purpose was to engage in “online global debate” focused on “the future of design.”

Others perceived intentions included:

“roundtable discussion”…“with every designer on Twitter.”

“dialogue between designers and the general public.”

“24-hour brainstorming on the future of design”

“allow creative folks to discuss current issues in design”

“get the pulse of the industry”

“a global conversation” “to alter the future of design.”

“[AIGA] expect[s] to better understand our role”

“explore ways [for AIGA] to better serve the needs of the design community.”

“bring designers and design followers together with leading minds in our profession”

“engage designers in a global conversation”

“exchange ideas, challenge viewpoints and push boundaries”

“an online, real-time think-tank”

“bring together a global community of designers and design enthusiasts.”

“evolve ideas, make connections and initiate change.”

Somehow others got the impression that “the ultimate goal” of 1D4D was:

“understanding how design could shape the future of the world”.

We love experiments but OMG what a confusing framing mix! There are at least half a dozen different dialogue mode types in that mix and more than a dozen different focus paths. That’s a lot of fuzzy complexity to hoist onto participants.

Maybe these designer types are from another planet and can digest multiple streams of giant-size fuzzy complexity while leaping tall buildings! It seemed more likely that 1D4D participants were going to be humans from planet earth. We could not help but wonder if anyone thought about the framing of this session from a human-centered perspective. Without that orientation the confusion of event dynamics can be as complicated as the subjects to be addressed. That cognitive double whammy tends to undermine and deplete participant energy.

All organizations face a continuously changing world and AIGA would be no exception. This could have been important strategic thinking work involving complex present and emerging future states, fuzzy challenges and opportunities. Apart from the romancing of social network technology, since when is Twitter geared up for such complex work?

Some of this framing implied outcomes other than casual chit-chat. Was it possible that 1D4D organizers did not understand the difference between a conversation, a debate, a roundtable, open dialogue and outcome oriented dialogue? Was it possible that 1D4D organizers did not understand the default dynamics of 100% emergence? We wondered what happened to the much-vaunted AIGA design process. It seemed to be completely absent.

We noticed that 1D4D participants were asked to imagine the future of something that AIGA leaders have presented no framing for in the present. How does that work? Was this event about the present and future of graphic design or something else?

We will gladly leave the post-session parsing of words used in the One Day for Design event to the analysis by others. We will happily leave commentary on how to improve the collaborative functionality of Twitter to our interaction oriented colleagues. With all due respect we leave AIGA members to sort out their own challenges as a still graphic design oriented professional association, struggling to reposition itself and expand into the broader strategic design community.

Our only concern is that it seems likely as a result of the AIGA Twitter event that considerable misunderstanding around what strategic design is and does, now seems to have been generated in the broader community outside of design. If the “meaning of design” was in fact tweaked by AIGA’s One Day for Design, it was not in a way that was particularly constructive, not in a way that relates to the many challenges and opportunities facing design. An unfortunate message seems to have been sent by 1D4D: that the design community of communities thinks change making cocreation and meaning making can be accomplished with sloganeering and soundbites. We assume that this meaning making was not AIGA’s intended message.

With all due respect to AIGA and its no doubt noble intentions:

Please don’t assume that AIGA represents the entire design community. It does not.

Please don’t assume that AIGA´s One Day for Design event on Twitter had anything to do with the present or future states of best design practice, methods, modes or consciousness outside of graphic design.

Please don’t assume that 1D4D has anything to do with how strategies are being cocreated today by organizational leaders interested in meaningful change making.

What was most interesting to us about One Day for Design was seen, not in the event itself, but rather in its aftermath. In the wave of post-event commentaries could be seen a thread of cocreation awareness connected to the not often talked about subject of emergence. It is becoming clear that there is rapidly rising awareness in several communities of practice including design, that fuzzy 100% emergent events are very time consuming for participants and typically problematic along what has already become a well-worn path (a subject onto itself).

Picture ahead: Multiply that 1D4D experience by 5 or 10 or 100 and at some point along the way, for some sooner, for others later, most will no doubt be ready for something, anything other than 100% emergence. That romance is rapidly dwindling. This is probably not so good news for those selling 100% emergence as a new collaboration holy grail.

As the number of professionals in various fields reach that realization it seems inevitable that much in the current mix will change. It is that rising awareness that will change not only how we work, but what we expect of our technologies, our organizations, our leaders and ultimately of ourselves.

Whether all of us like it or not, at the end of the day 1D4D represented one of many small defining moments in the slippery decline of 100% emergent events. Unless you have a lot of time on your hands, unless you want to repeat those outcomes, it is already time to rethink the think and move on. In that moving on many design opportunities can be found.

07
Feb

NextD Archive Launches

NextDesign Leadership Institute founded by GK VanPatter and Elizabeth Pastor has launched its Archive online. More than 30 NextD Journal conversations are being posted.

See the conversations that informed the creation of numerous NextD sensemaking frameworks 2002-20010 including NextDesign EcoSystem / Design 1,2,3,4.

Some of the gems:

Human-Centered Innovation: Understanding the IIT Institute of Design
GK VanPatter in conversation with Patrick Whitney

Design As Glue: Understanding Stanford d School
GK VanPatter in conversation with David Kelley

New Design Research: Leading or Following?
GK VanPatter in conversation with Ken Friedman PhD

GK Van Patter on Design Futures
NextDesign EcoSystem / Design 1, 2, 3, 4

You can follow NextD Journal on Twitter:
www.twitter.com/NextD

18
Nov

GK VanPatter at Aalto University

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter will give a talk on SenseMaking for ChangeMaking at Aalto University Design Factory in Helsinki Finland, next week, Wednesday November 24.

For more information contact: Wycliffe Raduma

wycliffe.raduma (at) tkk.fi

31
Aug

Humantific in Finland

Humantific CoFounder GK VanPatter will be giving several presentations on NextDesign Geographies / Understanding Design 1,2,3,4 and SenseMaking for ChangeMaking at Savonia University of Applied Sciences and Kuopio Academy of Design in Finland Sept 14, 15, 16. He will also be meeting with program leadership, observing studios, student work, etc.

To learn more about the PALMU UnConference at Kuopio Academy of Designsee Facebook: