INSPIRATION

04
Apr

Capitalizing on Complexity

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Catching up on some of our Inspiration postings as we don’t always have a chance to do so in real time..:-)

We were overjoyed to see this IBM report entitled “Capitalizing on Complexity / Insights from the Global CEO Study” as it very much reflects our own experience working with organizational leaders. We would recommend it to leaders interested in the subject of what is often referred to today as the Complexity Crisis.

This is essentially a survey of 1500+ CEOs worldwide regarding their perspectives on the subject and how they are addressing it inside their organizations. Published in 2012 these IBM CEO surveys are typically relevant for 5+ years depending on how fast or slow the economy and your organization are moving..:-) The Complexity Crisis remains front and center for many organizational leaders today.

It is interesting to see that this IBM report touches on and interconnects several different subjects that tend to be nested inside the Complexity Crisis.Continue Reading..

09
Mar

Civic Innovation Today/Tomorrow

Civic Innovation Field Scan - FINAL

We were delighted to see this useful Civic Innovation overview document published recently by the California Civic Innovation Project.

Authored by Alissa Black and Rachel Burstein “What Civic Innovation Looks Like Today and Tomorrow” contains many insights into the subject revealing its various complexities in progress. We would highly recommend this overview document to our readers.

Humantific is deeply involved in the civic innovation arena and what we see generally speaking is significant interest from numerous organizations in onboarding new forms of civic innovation leadership skills.Continue Reading..

09
Jan

ISOTYPE: The Inclusion Factor

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From the Humantific Collection here are more early Isotype Institute visualizations. Today in some circles, these might be referred to as “data visualizations” or “infographics”, previously referred to as “statistical graphics”, “picture statistics”, “pictorial statistics”, “information design” and or “information visualizations”.  :-) No shortage of terms now in play. If we want to use such terms these might be thought of as societal context infographics made with a specific, very practical purpose in mind.

Close to our own Humantific work, in terms on social change-making intention, we have deep respect for the work of Isotype [International System of Typographic Picture Education] Institute. Led by Otto Neurath [1882-1945], Isotype was a pioneer in the realm of what we know today to be Social SenseMaking. In the tsunami of data visualizations being generated today it is important to note some fundamental differences.Continue Reading..

18
Dec

Another OTHER Design Thinking

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Here at Humantific we are always delighted to see design education community change initiatives inspired by The OTHER Design Thinking 2013-2014, Occupy Reimagining Design 2011 and the body of work within NextDesign Futures 2002-2014. Are you ready to be surprised?

Yes that’s right, there is Another OTHER Design Thinking out there, just announced!

Last week the academically focused PhD Design discussion list, well known in the transformation practice community for being slow to adapt, least effective, and often unfortunately down-right nasty when it comes to the subject of design futures made what was for that group, a big leap forward. A few of its loudest, self-appointed leaders announced in a 3 page manifesto posted inside their debating group and across social media that they were finally ready to recognize a multiple part change wave occurring beyond the confines of their circle.Continue Reading..

19
Nov

Making Sense of Next Design Frontiers

This month and next we are republishing some materials from the Humantific Archives related to early views into the subject of rethinking design thinking, the value of strategic design, rethinking design education, etc.

This interview with GK VanPatter CoFounder of Humantific and NextDesign Leadership Network was first published in 2005.Continue Reading..

11
Nov

ReAppreciating Fritz Kahn

fritzKahnCoverCongratulations to our friends and colleagues Thilo von Debschitz and Uta von Debschitz for the successful redesign and republishing of the new expanded 390 page volume on Fritz Kahn. Bigger and better than the previous 2011 version this large format 2013 monograph will become an inspiring historical volume for many interested in the early days of what might be called metaphorical or analogous information design.

Inside are wonderful early versions of several forms of information design (now often being redepicted as “info-graphics”) including data visualizations and idea or concept visualizations. You don’t have to agree with every idea to appreciate the richness of this amazing work.Continue Reading..

29
Jul

15 Ways Making Innovation Real

GK VanPatter’s speech: 15 Ways to Make Innovation Real at Savonia University from the opening school year ceremony at innovation oriented Savonia University in Finland.

“In that moment I decided to embrace this accident.”

Enjoy this from the Humantific Archives.

08
Jul

Who Owns How Might We?

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Thanks Again, Sid Parnes!

With the marketplace vibe around the term “How Might We?” continuing, we thought this might be a good moment to revisit the subject and post a further clarification for our readers, many of whom are leading innovation-culture-building initiatives inside large organizations.

Our clients will already know that, for many years, numerous innovation firms, including Humantific, have been using How Might We? and other invitation stem phrases as part of how upstream challenge-framing is constructed. Use of the celebrated phrase is, by now, widespread around the world. With thousands of good people already integrating the phrase into their everyday work lives, the global How Might We? collaborative language adoption continues to grow every week, month, and year. At this point, many, many firms have played a role in that common innovation language adoption advocacy. As far as we can tell, it remains an open innovation adoption wave.Continue Reading..

07
Jun

MAKING SENSE OF: “Creative Intelligence”

What Seasoned Innovation Leaders Already Know!

Since the term Creative Intelligence” has reresurfaced in the mainstream business media recently with considerable hype, we thought this might be a good moment to post a few points of clarification for our Humantific readers – many of whom are innovation initiative leaders inside organizations, engaged in continous learning and innovation capacity building. To do that work effectively understanding some innovation history is useful.

Unless you are just discovering the subject of Creative Intelligence, you will probably know that, by the late 1950s and early 60s, Alex Osborn, JP Guildford, Eugene Brunelle, Sid Parnes and others in the applied creativity community (also known as the CPS community) were already connecting creative intelligence to creative behaviors and to creative problem solving process mastery.

The notion that everyone has the capacity to be creative was brought forth and championed by numerous pioneers in the applied creativity community, including Alex Osborn, Sid Parnes and JP Guilford beginning in the late 1940s.Continue Reading..

05
Jun

ReAppreciating Richard Saul Wurman

Starving for Understanding?

Required historical background reading for anyone joining Humantific is Richard Saul Wurman’s Information Anxiety, published in this first edition in 1989. Years later Richard did a refresh and republished the book as Information Anxiety 2. The later version is easier to find than the original book. Either is recommended if you want to better understand the remarkable time-warp story of how the Understanding Business, the Explaining Business, the SenseMaking Business actually preceded, by decades, the Big Data business.

Of course, all of the technology-related references inside Information Anxiety are now dated, but Richard’s central message remains even more relevant today than when it first appeared. Forget all the Big Data buzz for a moment. It was 20+ years ago that Richard began expressing concern about “the black hole between data and knowledge” and “the widening gap between what we understand and what we think we should understand”. It is rather amazing to consider Information Anxiety in the timeline of technology history. It was in 1989 that the world-wide-web began appearing in public and Apple introduced its Mac SE/30 and the Mac 11ci, running at 25 MHz with an 80 megabyte hard drive!Continue Reading..